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Title: Assessment of need for transport tubes when continuously monitoring for radioactive aerosols

Abstract

Aerosol transport tubes are often used to draw aerosol from desirable sampling locations to nearby air sampling equipment that cannot be placed at that location. In many plutonium laboratories at Los Alamos National Laboratory, aerosol transport tubes are used to transport aerosol from the front of room ventilation exhaust registers to continuous air monitors (CAMs) that are mounted on nearby walls. Despite designs to minimize particle loss in tubes, aerosol transport model predictions suggest losses occur lowering the sensitivity of CAMs to accidentally released plutonium aerosol. The goal of this study was to test the hypotheses that the reliability, speed, and sensitivity of aerosol detection would be equal whether the sample was extracted from the front of the exhaust register or from the wall location of CAMs. Polydisperse oil aerosols were released from multiple locations in two plutonium laboratories to simulate plutonium aerosol releases. Networked laser particle counters (LPCs) were positioned to simultaneously measure time-resolved aerosol concentrations at each exhaust register and at each wall-mounted CAM location.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20000250
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Health Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999; Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; RADIATION MONITORING; RADIOACTIVE AEROSOLS; AIR POLLUTION MONITORS; MODIFICATIONS; PLUTONIUM; PERFORMANCE TESTING

Citation Formats

Whicker, J.J., Rodgers, J.C., and Lopez, R.C. Assessment of need for transport tubes when continuously monitoring for radioactive aerosols. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1097/00004032-199909000-00012.
Whicker, J.J., Rodgers, J.C., & Lopez, R.C. Assessment of need for transport tubes when continuously monitoring for radioactive aerosols. United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-199909000-00012.
Whicker, J.J., Rodgers, J.C., and Lopez, R.C. Wed . "Assessment of need for transport tubes when continuously monitoring for radioactive aerosols". United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-199909000-00012.
@article{osti_20000250,
title = {Assessment of need for transport tubes when continuously monitoring for radioactive aerosols},
author = {Whicker, J.J. and Rodgers, J.C. and Lopez, R.C.},
abstractNote = {Aerosol transport tubes are often used to draw aerosol from desirable sampling locations to nearby air sampling equipment that cannot be placed at that location. In many plutonium laboratories at Los Alamos National Laboratory, aerosol transport tubes are used to transport aerosol from the front of room ventilation exhaust registers to continuous air monitors (CAMs) that are mounted on nearby walls. Despite designs to minimize particle loss in tubes, aerosol transport model predictions suggest losses occur lowering the sensitivity of CAMs to accidentally released plutonium aerosol. The goal of this study was to test the hypotheses that the reliability, speed, and sensitivity of aerosol detection would be equal whether the sample was extracted from the front of the exhaust register or from the wall location of CAMs. Polydisperse oil aerosols were released from multiple locations in two plutonium laboratories to simulate plutonium aerosol releases. Networked laser particle counters (LPCs) were positioned to simultaneously measure time-resolved aerosol concentrations at each exhaust register and at each wall-mounted CAM location.},
doi = {10.1097/00004032-199909000-00012},
journal = {Health Physics},
issn = {0017-9078},
number = 3,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}