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Title: Intrinsic fiber optic absorption sensors for the detection of volatile organic compounds

Abstract

Extensive contamination of ground water from organic solvents has placed a large emphasis on the development of instruments for remote in-situ sensing. Fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) have made a great deal of progress in this area. The authors have investigated two intrinsic FOCSs for the detection of volatile organic compounds. One is based on evanescent wave absorption and the other is a direct absorption core-based sensor. Both sensors make use of silicone polymers as selective membranes to extract the volatile analyte from the aqueous solution for analysis in the NIR. The rate limiting step for analyte diffusion into the membrane has been determined to be diffusion through the Nernstian boundary. With each sensor, the times required to reach an equilibrium response are on the order of 30 minutes for 20 ppm aqueous solution of trichloroethylene. Headspace measurements are much faster and reach equilibrium in 3-5 minutes. A comparison of the two sensors, detection limits, diffusion rates and effects of temperature will be discussed.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
191754
Report Number(s):
CONF-941098-
TRN: 95:006733-0110
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: FACSS XXI: 21st annual conference of the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS), St. Louis, MO (United States), 2-7 Oct 1994; Other Information: PBD: 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of 21st annual conference of the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies; PB: 257 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40 CHEMISTRY; 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; VOLATILE MATTER; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; GROUND WATER; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; FIBER OPTICS; MEMBRANES; EXTRACTION; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; KINETICS; EQUILIBRIUM

Citation Formats

Klunder, G L, and Russo, R E. Intrinsic fiber optic absorption sensors for the detection of volatile organic compounds. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Klunder, G L, & Russo, R E. Intrinsic fiber optic absorption sensors for the detection of volatile organic compounds. United States.
Klunder, G L, and Russo, R E. Sat . "Intrinsic fiber optic absorption sensors for the detection of volatile organic compounds". United States.
@article{osti_191754,
title = {Intrinsic fiber optic absorption sensors for the detection of volatile organic compounds},
author = {Klunder, G L and Russo, R E},
abstractNote = {Extensive contamination of ground water from organic solvents has placed a large emphasis on the development of instruments for remote in-situ sensing. Fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) have made a great deal of progress in this area. The authors have investigated two intrinsic FOCSs for the detection of volatile organic compounds. One is based on evanescent wave absorption and the other is a direct absorption core-based sensor. Both sensors make use of silicone polymers as selective membranes to extract the volatile analyte from the aqueous solution for analysis in the NIR. The rate limiting step for analyte diffusion into the membrane has been determined to be diffusion through the Nernstian boundary. With each sensor, the times required to reach an equilibrium response are on the order of 30 minutes for 20 ppm aqueous solution of trichloroethylene. Headspace measurements are much faster and reach equilibrium in 3-5 minutes. A comparison of the two sensors, detection limits, diffusion rates and effects of temperature will be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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