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Title: Numerical modeling of non-thermal plasma discharges

Abstract

This paper documents a detailed numerical model developed to simulate the physical and chemical processes that occur in a Non-Thermal Plasma Discharge (NTPD). Ozone production with NTPDs is a mature technology, dating back more than 100 years. However, it has only been during the last 20 years that many researchers have investigated NTPDs for gaseous pollutant destruction. The model described in this paper is for a double dielectric NTPD, a common type, in which the working gas flows between two dielectrics, each covering an electrode. A high voltage, and corresponding high electric field, is applied to the electrodes, polarizing the dielectrics and causing the gas to breakdown. At atmospheric pressures this breakdown results in a multitude of small discharge channels, called microdischarges. The dielectrics limit the duration of each discharge, preventing the electrons and heavy particles from coming to thermal equilibrium, and the free electrons within the microdischarges reach temperatures on the order of 50,000 K, while the temperature of the heavy particles remains approximately constant. These energetic electrons collide with molecular species resulting in the formation of radicals and other highly reactive compounds, and after the discharge extinguishes, these reactive compounds collide with other species, potentially resulting in desiredmore » chemical reactions. The model presented in this paper is based on a control volume approach, and it simulates both the microdischarges and subsequent chemical kinetics. Sample calculations are presented and compared to experimental results to lend some validity to the model.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Science Applications International Corp., Shalimar, FL (United States)
  2. Air Force Wright Lab., Eglin AFB, FL (United States). Armament Directorate
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
186837
Report Number(s):
CONF-9510125-
TRN: IM9609%%109
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International symposium on environmental technologies: plasma systems and applications, Atlanta, GA (United States), 8-11 Oct 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the international symposium on environmental technologies: Plasma systems and applications. Volume 1; Mayne, P.W.; Mulholland, J.A. [eds.] [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)]; PB: 335 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CHEMICAL REACTORS; PLASMA SIMULATION; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; PLASMA PRODUCTION; ELECTRIC DISCHARGES; TOWNSEND DISCHARGE; CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

Citation Formats

Rolader, G E, Hoffman, M P, and Federle, S P. Numerical modeling of non-thermal plasma discharges. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Rolader, G E, Hoffman, M P, & Federle, S P. Numerical modeling of non-thermal plasma discharges. United States.
Rolader, G E, Hoffman, M P, and Federle, S P. Sun . "Numerical modeling of non-thermal plasma discharges". United States.
@article{osti_186837,
title = {Numerical modeling of non-thermal plasma discharges},
author = {Rolader, G E and Hoffman, M P and Federle, S P},
abstractNote = {This paper documents a detailed numerical model developed to simulate the physical and chemical processes that occur in a Non-Thermal Plasma Discharge (NTPD). Ozone production with NTPDs is a mature technology, dating back more than 100 years. However, it has only been during the last 20 years that many researchers have investigated NTPDs for gaseous pollutant destruction. The model described in this paper is for a double dielectric NTPD, a common type, in which the working gas flows between two dielectrics, each covering an electrode. A high voltage, and corresponding high electric field, is applied to the electrodes, polarizing the dielectrics and causing the gas to breakdown. At atmospheric pressures this breakdown results in a multitude of small discharge channels, called microdischarges. The dielectrics limit the duration of each discharge, preventing the electrons and heavy particles from coming to thermal equilibrium, and the free electrons within the microdischarges reach temperatures on the order of 50,000 K, while the temperature of the heavy particles remains approximately constant. These energetic electrons collide with molecular species resulting in the formation of radicals and other highly reactive compounds, and after the discharge extinguishes, these reactive compounds collide with other species, potentially resulting in desired chemical reactions. The model presented in this paper is based on a control volume approach, and it simulates both the microdischarges and subsequent chemical kinetics. Sample calculations are presented and compared to experimental results to lend some validity to the model.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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