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Title: An algorithm for image clusters detection and identification based on color for an autonomous mobile robot

Abstract

An algorithm for detection and identification of image clusters or {open_quotes}blobs{close_quotes} based on color information for an autonomous mobile robot is developed. The input image data are first processed using a crisp color fuszzyfier, a binary smoothing filter, and a median filter. The processed image data is then inputed to the image clusters detection and identification program. The program employed the concept of {open_quotes}elastic rectangle{close_quotes}that stretches in such a way that the whole blob is finally enclosed in a rectangle. A C-program is develop to test the algorithm. The algorithm is tested only on image data of 8x8 sizes with different number of blobs in them. The algorithm works very in detecting and identifying image clusters.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
184307
Report Number(s):
DOE/OR/00033-T670
ON: DE96004962; TRN: 96:001286
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76OR00033
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1996]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; IMAGE PROCESSING; ALGORITHMS; ROBOTS; IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS; COLOR; FUZZY LOGIC

Citation Formats

Uy, D.L. An algorithm for image clusters detection and identification based on color for an autonomous mobile robot. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2172/184307.
Uy, D.L. An algorithm for image clusters detection and identification based on color for an autonomous mobile robot. United States. doi:10.2172/184307.
Uy, D.L. Thu . "An algorithm for image clusters detection and identification based on color for an autonomous mobile robot". United States. doi:10.2172/184307. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/184307.
@article{osti_184307,
title = {An algorithm for image clusters detection and identification based on color for an autonomous mobile robot},
author = {Uy, D.L.},
abstractNote = {An algorithm for detection and identification of image clusters or {open_quotes}blobs{close_quotes} based on color information for an autonomous mobile robot is developed. The input image data are first processed using a crisp color fuszzyfier, a binary smoothing filter, and a median filter. The processed image data is then inputed to the image clusters detection and identification program. The program employed the concept of {open_quotes}elastic rectangle{close_quotes}that stretches in such a way that the whole blob is finally enclosed in a rectangle. A C-program is develop to test the algorithm. The algorithm is tested only on image data of 8x8 sizes with different number of blobs in them. The algorithm works very in detecting and identifying image clusters.},
doi = {10.2172/184307},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Technical Report:

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