skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Congress split on best way to reshape network of labs

Abstract

Reducing the size of the federal bureaucracy was a bread-and -butter issue for the Republicans who took over Congress in January. And the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) $6 billion network of national laboratories seemed like a tempting morsel. But 9 months later, congressional plates are loaded down with competing plans to reform the DOE labs, and the issue is giving majority members a case of indigestion. Their discomfort seems likely to delay adoption of any reform plans until at least next year. This article discusses the broad alternatives and possibilities for the future.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
183572
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science; Journal Volume: 269; Journal Issue: 5230; Other Information: PBD: 15 Sep 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; LABORATORIES; BUDGETS; US DOE; ENERGY POLICY; POLITICAL ASPECTS

Citation Formats

Lawler, A. Congress split on best way to reshape network of labs. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1126/science.269.5230.1510.
Lawler, A. Congress split on best way to reshape network of labs. United States. doi:10.1126/science.269.5230.1510.
Lawler, A. 1995. "Congress split on best way to reshape network of labs". United States. doi:10.1126/science.269.5230.1510.
@article{osti_183572,
title = {Congress split on best way to reshape network of labs},
author = {Lawler, A.},
abstractNote = {Reducing the size of the federal bureaucracy was a bread-and -butter issue for the Republicans who took over Congress in January. And the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) $6 billion network of national laboratories seemed like a tempting morsel. But 9 months later, congressional plates are loaded down with competing plans to reform the DOE labs, and the issue is giving majority members a case of indigestion. Their discomfort seems likely to delay adoption of any reform plans until at least next year. This article discusses the broad alternatives and possibilities for the future.},
doi = {10.1126/science.269.5230.1510},
journal = {Science},
number = 5230,
volume = 269,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 9
}
  • This article is a review of the industry comments following Congressional action that cancelled the Superconducting Super Collider. Aside from the direct damage to future high energy physics research, the loss of this project will have a major adverse effect on the development of superconducting technology.
  • Two bills that would transform the missions and practices of the Department of Energy's research laboratories are moving forward in both branches of Congress. Each of the two is crafted to improve cooperative research between DOE and private industry, but the House bill goes further by making fundamental changes in lab administration. H.R. 1432 provides a clear statement of purpose for the labs. The eight missions outlined in the bill are as follows: Enhance the nation's understanding of energy production and use, with a goal of reducing reliance on imported sources of fuels; Advance nuclear science and technology for nationalmore » security purposes; Assist with dismantlement of nuclear weapons and work to curb nuclear arms proliferation; Conduct fundamental research in energy-related science and technology; Assist in development of technologies for disposal of hazardous wastes, particularly nuclear waste; Work with private industry to develop generic green technologies; Conduct technology-transfer activities; and Work to improve the quality of science, math, and engineering education in the U.S.« less
  • The searches of impulsive gravitational waves (GW) in the data of the ground-based interferometers focus essentially on two types of waveforms: short unmodeled bursts from supernova core collapses and frequency modulated signals (or chirps) from inspiralling compact binaries. There is room for other types of searches based on different models. Our objective is to fill this gap. More specifically, we are interested in GW chirps ''in general,'' i.e., with an arbitrary phase/frequency vs time evolution. These unmodeled GW chirps may be considered as the generic signature of orbiting or spinning sources. We expect the quasiperiodic nature of the waveform tomore » be preserved independently of the physics which governs the source motion. Several methods have been introduced to address the detection of unmodeled chirps using the data of a single detector. Those include the best chirplet chain (BCC) algorithm introduced by the authors. In the next years, several detectors will be in operation. Improvements can be expected from the joint observation of a GW by multiple detectors and the coherent analysis of their data, namely, a larger sight horizon and the more accurate estimation of the source location and the wave polarization angles. Here, we present an extension of the BCC search to the multiple detector case. This work is based on the coherent analysis scheme proposed in the detection of inspiralling binary chirps. We revisit the derivation of the optimal statistic with a new formalism which allows the adaptation to the detection of unmodeled chirps. The method amounts to searching for salient paths in the combined time-frequency representation of two synthetic streams. The latter are time series which combine the data from each detector linearly in such a way that all the GW signatures received are added constructively. We give a proof of principle for the full-sky blind search in a simplified situation which shows that the joint estimation of the source sky location and chirp frequency is possible.« less
  • Introduction—Commensal gut microbiota play an important role in regulating metabolic and inflammatory conditions. Reshaping intestinal microbiota through pharmacologic means may be a viable treatment option. Here we sought to delineate the functional characteristics of glucocorticoid-mediated alterations on gut microbiota and their subsequent repercussions on host mucin regulation and colonic inflammation. Methods—Adult male C57Bl/6 mice, germ-free (GF), Muc2-heterozygote (±), or Muc2-knockout (-/-) were injected with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, for four weeks. Fecal samples were collected for gut microbiota analysis via 16S rRNA T-RFLP and amplicon sequencing. Intestinal mucosa was collected for mucin gene expression studies. GF mice were conventionalized withmore » gut microbes from treated- and non-treated groups to determine their functional capacities in recipient hosts. Results—Exposure to DEX in WT mice led to substantial shifts in gut microbiota over a four-week period. Furthermore, a significant down-regulation of colonic Muc2 gene expression was observed after treatment. Muc2-knockout mice harbored a pro-inflammatory environment of gut microbes, characterized by the increase or decrease in prevalence of specific microbiota populations such as Clostridiales and Lactobacillaceae, respectively. This colitogenic phenotype was transmissible to IL10-knockout (IL10-KO) mice, a genetically susceptible model of colonic inflammatory disorders. Microbiota from donors pre-treated with DEX, however, ameliorated symptoms of inflammation. We conclude that commensal gut bacteria may be a key mediator of the anti-inflammatory effects observed in the large intestine after GC exposure. These findings underscore the notion that intestinal microbes comprise a “microbial organ” essential for host physiology that can be targeted by therapeutic approaches to restore intestinal homeostasis.« less