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Title: Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. Quarterly progress report, July 15, 1995--September 15, 1995

Abstract

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is actively pursuing the development of reliable and cost-effective processes to clean coal gasifier gases for application to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plants. A large portion of gas cleanup research has been directed towards hot gas desulfurization using Zn-based sorbents. However, zinc titinate sorbents undergo reduction to the metal at temperatures approaching 700{degrees}C. In addition, sulfate formation during regeneration leads to spalling of reactive 293 surfaces. Due to zinc-based sorbent performance, METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based sorbents. Westmoreland and Harrison evaluated numerous candidate sulfur sorbents and identified Mn as a good candidate. Later, Turkdogan and Olsson tested manganese-based sorbents which demonstrated superior desulfurization capacity under high temperatures, and reducing conditions. Recently, Ben-Slimane and Hepworth conducted several studies on formulating Mn-sorbents and desulfurizing a simulated fuel gas. Although thermodynamics predicts higher over-pressures with Mn verses Zn, under certain operating conditions Mn-based sorbents may obtain < 20 ppmv. In addition, the manganese-sulfur-oxygen (Mn-S-O) system does not reduce to the metal under even highly reducing gases at high temperatures (550-900{degrees}C). Currently, many proposed IGCC processes include a watermore » quench prior to desulfurization. This is for two reasons; limitations in the process hardware (1000{degrees}C), and excessive Zn-based sorbent loss (about 700{degrees}C). With manganese the water quench is obviated due to sorbent loss, as Mn-based sorbents have been shown to retain reactivity under cycling testing at 900{degrees}C. This reduces system hardware, and increases thermal efficiency while decreasing the equilibrium H{sub 2}S over-pressure obtainable with a manganese sorbent.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Mineral Engineering
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
181492
Report Number(s):
DOE/PC/94212-T4
ON: DE96005024; TRN: 96:001226
DOE Contract Number:  
FG22-94PC94212
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 15 Sep 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL GAS; DESULFURIZATION; MANGANESE OXIDES; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; PROGRESS REPORT; FUEL GAS; EQUILIBRIUM; MANGANESE; THERMAL EFFICIENCY; THERMODYNAMICS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Hepworth, M.T. Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. Quarterly progress report, July 15, 1995--September 15, 1995. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/181492.
Hepworth, M.T. Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. Quarterly progress report, July 15, 1995--September 15, 1995. United States. doi:10.2172/181492.
Hepworth, M.T. Fri . "Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. Quarterly progress report, July 15, 1995--September 15, 1995". United States. doi:10.2172/181492. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/181492.
@article{osti_181492,
title = {Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. Quarterly progress report, July 15, 1995--September 15, 1995},
author = {Hepworth, M.T.},
abstractNote = {The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is actively pursuing the development of reliable and cost-effective processes to clean coal gasifier gases for application to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plants. A large portion of gas cleanup research has been directed towards hot gas desulfurization using Zn-based sorbents. However, zinc titinate sorbents undergo reduction to the metal at temperatures approaching 700{degrees}C. In addition, sulfate formation during regeneration leads to spalling of reactive 293 surfaces. Due to zinc-based sorbent performance, METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based sorbents. Westmoreland and Harrison evaluated numerous candidate sulfur sorbents and identified Mn as a good candidate. Later, Turkdogan and Olsson tested manganese-based sorbents which demonstrated superior desulfurization capacity under high temperatures, and reducing conditions. Recently, Ben-Slimane and Hepworth conducted several studies on formulating Mn-sorbents and desulfurizing a simulated fuel gas. Although thermodynamics predicts higher over-pressures with Mn verses Zn, under certain operating conditions Mn-based sorbents may obtain < 20 ppmv. In addition, the manganese-sulfur-oxygen (Mn-S-O) system does not reduce to the metal under even highly reducing gases at high temperatures (550-900{degrees}C). Currently, many proposed IGCC processes include a water quench prior to desulfurization. This is for two reasons; limitations in the process hardware (1000{degrees}C), and excessive Zn-based sorbent loss (about 700{degrees}C). With manganese the water quench is obviated due to sorbent loss, as Mn-based sorbents have been shown to retain reactivity under cycling testing at 900{degrees}C. This reduces system hardware, and increases thermal efficiency while decreasing the equilibrium H{sub 2}S over-pressure obtainable with a manganese sorbent.},
doi = {10.2172/181492},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Fri Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}

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