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Title: Release of U(VI) from spent biosorbent immobilized in cement concrete blocks

Abstract

This paper deals with cementation as the method for the disposal of spent biosorbent, Ganoderma lucidum (a wood rotting macrofungi) after it is used for the removal of Uranium. Results on the uranium release during the curing of cement-concrete (CC) blocks indicated that placing the spent sorbent at the center of the blocks during their casting yields better immobilization of uranium as compared to the homogeneous mixing of the spent sorbent with the cement. Short term leach tests indicated that the uranium release was negligible in simulated seawater, 1.8% in 0.2 N sodium carbonate and 6.0% in 0.2 N HCl. The latter two leachates were used to represent the extreme environmental conditions. It was observed that the presence of the spent biosorbent up to 5% by weight did not affect the compressive strength of CC blocks. Thus cementation technique is suitable for the immobilization of uranium loaded biosorbent for its ultimate disposal.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
178307
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cement and Concrete Research; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; BIOADSORBENTS; CEMENTING; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE FORMS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; URANIUM; LEACHING; FUNGI; SODIUM CARBONATES; HYDROCHLORIC ACID; SEAWATER; CONCENTRATION RATIO; COMPRESSION STRENGTH; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES

Citation Formats

Venkobachar, C., Iyengar, L., Mishra, U.K., and Chauhan, M.S. Release of U(VI) from spent biosorbent immobilized in cement concrete blocks. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1016/0008-8846(95)00160-3.
Venkobachar, C., Iyengar, L., Mishra, U.K., & Chauhan, M.S. Release of U(VI) from spent biosorbent immobilized in cement concrete blocks. United States. doi:10.1016/0008-8846(95)00160-3.
Venkobachar, C., Iyengar, L., Mishra, U.K., and Chauhan, M.S. 1995. "Release of U(VI) from spent biosorbent immobilized in cement concrete blocks". United States. doi:10.1016/0008-8846(95)00160-3.
@article{osti_178307,
title = {Release of U(VI) from spent biosorbent immobilized in cement concrete blocks},
author = {Venkobachar, C. and Iyengar, L. and Mishra, U.K. and Chauhan, M.S.},
abstractNote = {This paper deals with cementation as the method for the disposal of spent biosorbent, Ganoderma lucidum (a wood rotting macrofungi) after it is used for the removal of Uranium. Results on the uranium release during the curing of cement-concrete (CC) blocks indicated that placing the spent sorbent at the center of the blocks during their casting yields better immobilization of uranium as compared to the homogeneous mixing of the spent sorbent with the cement. Short term leach tests indicated that the uranium release was negligible in simulated seawater, 1.8% in 0.2 N sodium carbonate and 6.0% in 0.2 N HCl. The latter two leachates were used to represent the extreme environmental conditions. It was observed that the presence of the spent biosorbent up to 5% by weight did not affect the compressive strength of CC blocks. Thus cementation technique is suitable for the immobilization of uranium loaded biosorbent for its ultimate disposal.},
doi = {10.1016/0008-8846(95)00160-3},
journal = {Cement and Concrete Research},
number = 8,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}
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