skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Autonomous Energy Grids: Controlling the Future Grid With Large Amounts of Distributed Energy Resources

Abstract

The drastic price reduction in variable renewable energy, such as wind and solar, coupled with the ease of use of smart technologies at the consumer level, is driving dramatic changes to the power system that will significantly transform how power is made, delivered, and used. Distributed energy resources (DERs)-which can include solar photovoltaic (PV), fuel cells, microturbines, gensets, distributed energy storage (e.g., batteries and ice storage), and new loads [e.g., electric vehicles (EVs), LED lighting, smart appliances, and electric heat pumps]-are being added to electric grids and causing bidirectional power flows and voltage fluctuations that can impact optimal control and system operation. Residential solar installations are expected to increase approximately 8% annually through 2050. Customer battery systems are anticipated to reach almost 1.9 GW by 2024, and current forecasts project that approximately 18.7 million EVs will be on U.S. roads in 2030. With numbers like these, it is not unreasonable to imagine a residential electricity customer having at least five controllable DERs. In future

Authors:
; ; ORCiD logo; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1726056
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5D00-78467
MainId:32384;UUID:381d390b-a9ed-4951-a9e6-8e3e848eb5af;MainAdminID:18881
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
IEEE Power & Energy Magazine
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; autonomous systems; power grids; energy storage; load flow; distributed power generation; renewable energy sources; transforms; electric vehicles

Citation Formats

Kroposki, Benjamin, Bernstein, Andrey, King, Jennifer, Vaidhynathan, Deepthi, Zhou, Xinyang, Chang, Chin-Yao, and Dall'Anese, Emiliano. Autonomous Energy Grids: Controlling the Future Grid With Large Amounts of Distributed Energy Resources. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1109/MPE.2020.3014540.
Kroposki, Benjamin, Bernstein, Andrey, King, Jennifer, Vaidhynathan, Deepthi, Zhou, Xinyang, Chang, Chin-Yao, & Dall'Anese, Emiliano. Autonomous Energy Grids: Controlling the Future Grid With Large Amounts of Distributed Energy Resources. United States. https://doi.org/10.1109/MPE.2020.3014540
Kroposki, Benjamin, Bernstein, Andrey, King, Jennifer, Vaidhynathan, Deepthi, Zhou, Xinyang, Chang, Chin-Yao, and Dall'Anese, Emiliano. Mon . "Autonomous Energy Grids: Controlling the Future Grid With Large Amounts of Distributed Energy Resources". United States. https://doi.org/10.1109/MPE.2020.3014540.
@article{osti_1726056,
title = {Autonomous Energy Grids: Controlling the Future Grid With Large Amounts of Distributed Energy Resources},
author = {Kroposki, Benjamin and Bernstein, Andrey and King, Jennifer and Vaidhynathan, Deepthi and Zhou, Xinyang and Chang, Chin-Yao and Dall'Anese, Emiliano},
abstractNote = {The drastic price reduction in variable renewable energy, such as wind and solar, coupled with the ease of use of smart technologies at the consumer level, is driving dramatic changes to the power system that will significantly transform how power is made, delivered, and used. Distributed energy resources (DERs)-which can include solar photovoltaic (PV), fuel cells, microturbines, gensets, distributed energy storage (e.g., batteries and ice storage), and new loads [e.g., electric vehicles (EVs), LED lighting, smart appliances, and electric heat pumps]-are being added to electric grids and causing bidirectional power flows and voltage fluctuations that can impact optimal control and system operation. Residential solar installations are expected to increase approximately 8% annually through 2050. Customer battery systems are anticipated to reach almost 1.9 GW by 2024, and current forecasts project that approximately 18.7 million EVs will be on U.S. roads in 2030. With numbers like these, it is not unreasonable to imagine a residential electricity customer having at least five controllable DERs. In future},
doi = {10.1109/MPE.2020.3014540},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1726056}, journal = {IEEE Power & Energy Magazine},
number = 6,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {10}
}