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Title: Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

Abstract

The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
MSE, Inc., Butte, MT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
172084
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/12735-T37
ON: DE96004110; TRN: 96:003711
DOE Contract Number:  
AC22-88ID12735
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1996]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; REMEDIAL ACTION; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; METALS; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; RADIOISOTOPES; PLANTS; BIOCHEMISTRY; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; COMMERCIALIZATION; LAND POLLUTION CONTROL; PROGRESS REPORT; SOILS; SURFACE WATERS; GROUND WATER; BIOTECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2172/172084.
. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/172084
. 1996. "Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/172084. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/172084.
@article{osti_172084,
title = {Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995},
author = {},
abstractNote = {The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations.},
doi = {10.2172/172084},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/172084}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {1}
}