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Title: Comparison of some corrosion-protective coatings for inner surfaces of tanks

Abstract

Zinc-filled, sprayed-zinc, epoxy, and vinyl chloride coatings were comparatively studied as applied to corrosion protection of inner surfaces and tanks for clarified petroleum products. Tests were carried out by cycles of temperature variation from 60{degrees}C to - 25{degrees}C, on steel plates in vapor, in fuel, and in electrolyte, simulating sub-product water. The coatings KhS-5132, KhS-717 (vinyl chloride) and BEP-68, EP-525, EP-0010 (epoxy) are of the highest protective properties, resistant to steaming and washing with aqueous solutions of synthetic detergents, and are compatible with clarified petroleum products.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
171808
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Protection of Metals; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Jul-Aug 1995; TN: Translated from Zashchita Metallov; 31: No. 4, 419-421(1995)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 02 PETROLEUM; TANKS; CORROSION PROTECTION; COATINGS; ZINC; EPOXIDES; VINYL CHLORIDE; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0065-0273 K; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; STEELS; FUELS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

Citation Formats

Mityagin, V.A., Vigant, G.T., and Zakharova, N.N.. Comparison of some corrosion-protective coatings for inner surfaces of tanks. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Mityagin, V.A., Vigant, G.T., & Zakharova, N.N.. Comparison of some corrosion-protective coatings for inner surfaces of tanks. United States.
Mityagin, V.A., Vigant, G.T., and Zakharova, N.N.. 1995. "Comparison of some corrosion-protective coatings for inner surfaces of tanks". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_171808,
title = {Comparison of some corrosion-protective coatings for inner surfaces of tanks},
author = {Mityagin, V.A. and Vigant, G.T. and Zakharova, N.N.},
abstractNote = {Zinc-filled, sprayed-zinc, epoxy, and vinyl chloride coatings were comparatively studied as applied to corrosion protection of inner surfaces and tanks for clarified petroleum products. Tests were carried out by cycles of temperature variation from 60{degrees}C to - 25{degrees}C, on steel plates in vapor, in fuel, and in electrolyte, simulating sub-product water. The coatings KhS-5132, KhS-717 (vinyl chloride) and BEP-68, EP-525, EP-0010 (epoxy) are of the highest protective properties, resistant to steaming and washing with aqueous solutions of synthetic detergents, and are compatible with clarified petroleum products.},
doi = {},
journal = {Protection of Metals},
number = 4,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month = 7
}
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