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Title: The response of an ocean general circulation model to surface wind stress produced by an atmospheric general circulation model

Abstract

Two surface wind stress datasets for 1979-91, one based on observations and the other from an investigation of the COLA atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with prescribed SST, are used to drive the GFDL ocean general circulation model. These two runs are referred to as the control and COLA experiments, respectively. Simulated SST and upper-ocean heat contents (HC) in the tropical Pacific Ocean are compared with observations and between experiments. Both simulation reproduced the observed mean SST and HC fields as well as their annual cycles realistically. Major errors common to both runs are colder than observed SST in the eastern equatorial ocean and HC in the western Pacific south of the equator, with errors generally larger in the COLA experiment. New errors arising from the AGCM wind forcing include higher SST near the South American coast throughout the year and weaker HC gradients along the equator in boreal spring. The former is associated with suppressed coastal upwelling by weak along shore AGCM winds, and the latter is caused by weaker equatorial easterlies in boreal spring. The low-frequency ENSO fluctuations are also realistic for both runs. Correlations between the observed and simulated SST anomalies from the COLA simulation are asmore » high as those from the control run in the central equatorial Pacific. A major problem in the COLA simulation is the appearance of unrealistic tropical cold anomalies during the boreal spring of mature El Nino years. These anomalies propagate along the equator from the western Pacific to the eastern coast in about three months, and temporarily eliminate the warm SST and HC anomalies in the eastern Pacific. This erroneous oceanic response in the COLA simulation is caused by a reversal of the westerly wind anomalies on the equator, associated with an unrealistic southward shift of the ITCZ in boreal spring during El Nino events. 66 refs., 16 figs.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Institute of Global Environment and Society, Inc., Calverton, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
171794
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Monthly Weather Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 123; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GENERAL CIRCULATION MODELS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; WIND; FORCING FUNCTIONS; OCEANIC CIRCULATION; AIR-WATER INTERACTIONS; HEAT FLUX; PACIFIC OCEAN; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Huang, B, and Schneider, E K. The response of an ocean general circulation model to surface wind stress produced by an atmospheric general circulation model. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1175/1520-0493(1995)123<3059:TROAOG>2.0.CO;2.
Huang, B, & Schneider, E K. The response of an ocean general circulation model to surface wind stress produced by an atmospheric general circulation model. United States. https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0493(1995)123<3059:TROAOG>2.0.CO;2
Huang, B, and Schneider, E K. 1995. "The response of an ocean general circulation model to surface wind stress produced by an atmospheric general circulation model". United States. https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0493(1995)123<3059:TROAOG>2.0.CO;2.
@article{osti_171794,
title = {The response of an ocean general circulation model to surface wind stress produced by an atmospheric general circulation model},
author = {Huang, B and Schneider, E K},
abstractNote = {Two surface wind stress datasets for 1979-91, one based on observations and the other from an investigation of the COLA atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with prescribed SST, are used to drive the GFDL ocean general circulation model. These two runs are referred to as the control and COLA experiments, respectively. Simulated SST and upper-ocean heat contents (HC) in the tropical Pacific Ocean are compared with observations and between experiments. Both simulation reproduced the observed mean SST and HC fields as well as their annual cycles realistically. Major errors common to both runs are colder than observed SST in the eastern equatorial ocean and HC in the western Pacific south of the equator, with errors generally larger in the COLA experiment. New errors arising from the AGCM wind forcing include higher SST near the South American coast throughout the year and weaker HC gradients along the equator in boreal spring. The former is associated with suppressed coastal upwelling by weak along shore AGCM winds, and the latter is caused by weaker equatorial easterlies in boreal spring. The low-frequency ENSO fluctuations are also realistic for both runs. Correlations between the observed and simulated SST anomalies from the COLA simulation are as high as those from the control run in the central equatorial Pacific. A major problem in the COLA simulation is the appearance of unrealistic tropical cold anomalies during the boreal spring of mature El Nino years. These anomalies propagate along the equator from the western Pacific to the eastern coast in about three months, and temporarily eliminate the warm SST and HC anomalies in the eastern Pacific. This erroneous oceanic response in the COLA simulation is caused by a reversal of the westerly wind anomalies on the equator, associated with an unrealistic southward shift of the ITCZ in boreal spring during El Nino events. 66 refs., 16 figs.},
doi = {10.1175/1520-0493(1995)123<3059:TROAOG>2.0.CO;2},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/171794}, journal = {Monthly Weather Review},
number = 10,
volume = 123,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {10}
}