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Title: Experimental Study of the Fundamental Properties of Warm Dense Mixtures

Abstract

The aim of the proposed research was to provide a multi-scale study of the properties of warm dense hydrocarbons, by studying the thermodynamic properties through the equation of state and the microscopic properties by x-ray scattering. Understanding the fundamental properties of warm dense mixtures is an intellectual challenge due to the complexity of the system. Unlike liquids or gases, where constituent particle interactions occur through collisions or bonding between valence electrons, in these strongly coupled systems the atoms will be partially ionized and compressed so tightly together that interactions between the inner core electrons can play a role in the systems chemistry. Advances in computational capabilities and development of new theoretical models have been used to predict the properties of mixtures but there is currently no experimental data of the fundamental interaction between the particles in mixtures to test these predictions against. The proposed research was to experimentally investigate the interaction of the different species in hydrocarbons by measuring the compressibility of substances with different carbon and hydrogen ratios and the complexity of the microscopic interactions through elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering. To study the bulk properties of warm dense hydrocarbons we established the Warm Dense Matter Research Laboratory (WDMRL)more » in the Institute for Shock Physics at Washington State University. The goal was for experiments in the WDMRL to determine shock loading conditions of interest in the hydrocarbon mixtures. We planned on using Hugoniot EOS measurements and a range of carbon and hydrogen concentrations to determine conditions when the EOS of the mixture varied significantly from that of the classical mixing model. Even though shock transit measurements through aluminum foils suggested pressures upto 400GPa, the experiments in the WDMRL were unsuccessful in getting usable shockwave compression data above 100GPa in polystyrene which was below the pressure of interest for hydrocarbon mixtures (>200GPa). To complete the project, we tested a technique using x-ray phase contrast imaging to map the location of tracer layers in a test sample of polycarbonate to record the material motion in dynamically compressed samples. A technique that will be useful for future warm dense matter experiments. These experiments used <200nm gold layers in polycarbonate samples to measure the material velocity and shock speed using x-ray phase contrast imaging. These results were compared to continuum surface measurements performed at ISP and show that the tracer layer technique can measure hydrodynamic properties accurately in dynamically compressed materials« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. for Shock Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES)
OSTI Identifier:
1712448
Report Number(s):
DOE-WSU-0016360
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0016360
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; Warm Dense Matter

Citation Formats

Hawreliak, James. Experimental Study of the Fundamental Properties of Warm Dense Mixtures. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1712448.
Hawreliak, James. Experimental Study of the Fundamental Properties of Warm Dense Mixtures. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1712448
Hawreliak, James. 2020. "Experimental Study of the Fundamental Properties of Warm Dense Mixtures". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1712448. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1712448.
@article{osti_1712448,
title = {Experimental Study of the Fundamental Properties of Warm Dense Mixtures},
author = {Hawreliak, James},
abstractNote = {The aim of the proposed research was to provide a multi-scale study of the properties of warm dense hydrocarbons, by studying the thermodynamic properties through the equation of state and the microscopic properties by x-ray scattering. Understanding the fundamental properties of warm dense mixtures is an intellectual challenge due to the complexity of the system. Unlike liquids or gases, where constituent particle interactions occur through collisions or bonding between valence electrons, in these strongly coupled systems the atoms will be partially ionized and compressed so tightly together that interactions between the inner core electrons can play a role in the systems chemistry. Advances in computational capabilities and development of new theoretical models have been used to predict the properties of mixtures but there is currently no experimental data of the fundamental interaction between the particles in mixtures to test these predictions against. The proposed research was to experimentally investigate the interaction of the different species in hydrocarbons by measuring the compressibility of substances with different carbon and hydrogen ratios and the complexity of the microscopic interactions through elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering. To study the bulk properties of warm dense hydrocarbons we established the Warm Dense Matter Research Laboratory (WDMRL) in the Institute for Shock Physics at Washington State University. The goal was for experiments in the WDMRL to determine shock loading conditions of interest in the hydrocarbon mixtures. We planned on using Hugoniot EOS measurements and a range of carbon and hydrogen concentrations to determine conditions when the EOS of the mixture varied significantly from that of the classical mixing model. Even though shock transit measurements through aluminum foils suggested pressures upto 400GPa, the experiments in the WDMRL were unsuccessful in getting usable shockwave compression data above 100GPa in polystyrene which was below the pressure of interest for hydrocarbon mixtures (>200GPa). To complete the project, we tested a technique using x-ray phase contrast imaging to map the location of tracer layers in a test sample of polycarbonate to record the material motion in dynamically compressed samples. A technique that will be useful for future warm dense matter experiments. These experiments used <200nm gold layers in polycarbonate samples to measure the material velocity and shock speed using x-ray phase contrast imaging. These results were compared to continuum surface measurements performed at ISP and show that the tracer layer technique can measure hydrodynamic properties accurately in dynamically compressed materials},
doi = {10.2172/1712448},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1712448}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {11}
}