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Title: Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings

Abstract

We report the formation of beryllium doped plasma polymerized coatings derived from a helical resonator deposition apparatus, using diethylberyllium as the organometaric source. These coatings had an appearance not unlike plain plasma polymer and were relatively stable to ambient exposure. The coatings were characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Coating rates approaching 0.7 {mu}m hr{sup {minus}1} were obtained with a beryllium-to-carbon ratio of 1:1.3. There is also a significant oxygen presence in the coating as well which is attributed to oxidation upon exposure of the coating to air. The XPS data show only one peak for beryllium with the preponderance of the XPS data suggesting that the beryllium exists as BeO. Diethylberyllium was found to be inadequate as a source for beryllium doped plasma polymer, due to thermal decomposition and low vapor recovery rates.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
167226
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-122144; CONF-951030-5
ON: DE96003742; TRN: 96:003185
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 42. National Symposium of the American Vacuum Society (AVS), Minneapolis, MN (United States), 16-20 Oct 1995; Other Information: PBD: 4 Oct 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BERYLLIUM; DEPOSITION; THERMONUCLEAR REACTOR MATERIALS; BERYLLIUM OXIDES; VAPOR DEPOSITED COATINGS; ICP MASS SPECTROSCOPY; X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY; PHOTOELECTRON COUNTING; INERTIAL CONFINEMENT

Citation Formats

Brusasco, R., Letts, S., Miller, P., Saculla, M., and Cook, R. Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Brusasco, R., Letts, S., Miller, P., Saculla, M., & Cook, R. Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings. United States.
Brusasco, R., Letts, S., Miller, P., Saculla, M., and Cook, R. Wed . "Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/167226.
@article{osti_167226,
title = {Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings},
author = {Brusasco, R. and Letts, S. and Miller, P. and Saculla, M. and Cook, R.},
abstractNote = {We report the formation of beryllium doped plasma polymerized coatings derived from a helical resonator deposition apparatus, using diethylberyllium as the organometaric source. These coatings had an appearance not unlike plain plasma polymer and were relatively stable to ambient exposure. The coatings were characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Coating rates approaching 0.7 {mu}m hr{sup {minus}1} were obtained with a beryllium-to-carbon ratio of 1:1.3. There is also a significant oxygen presence in the coating as well which is attributed to oxidation upon exposure of the coating to air. The XPS data show only one peak for beryllium with the preponderance of the XPS data suggesting that the beryllium exists as BeO. Diethylberyllium was found to be inadequate as a source for beryllium doped plasma polymer, due to thermal decomposition and low vapor recovery rates.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Oct 04 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Wed Oct 04 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}

Conference:
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  • We report the formation of beryllium doped plasma polymerized coatings derived from a helical resonator deposition apparatus, using diethylberyllium as the organometallic source. These coatings had an appearance not unlike plain plasma polymer and were relatively stable to ambient exposure. The coatings were characterized by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Coating rates approaching 0.7 {mu}mh{sup {minus}1} were obtained with a beryllium-to-carbon ratio of 1:1.3. There is also a significant oxygen presence in the coating as well which is attributed to oxidation upon exposure of the coating to air. The XPS data show only one peakmore » for beryllium with the preponderance of the XPS data suggesting that the beryllium exists as BeO. Diethylberyllium was found to be inadequate as a source for beryllium doped plasma polymer, due to thermal decomposition and low vapor recovery rates. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}« less
  • OAK-B135 Copper doped polymer shells can provide a very useful diagnostic for fast ignition experiments currently being performed at various laboratories around the world. The low concentration copper dopant acts as an efficient x-ray source providing information on the physics of fast ignition. They have developed copper doped glow discharge (GDP) coatings suitable for such purposes. Copper acetylacetonate (CuAcAC), a solid at room temperature, was used in a heated jacket as the dopant source. They used this technique to fabricate thin ({approx} 5-7 {micro}m) GDP shells doped with {approx} 1 at% copper through the depolymerizable mandrel process for fast ignitionmore » experiments. The details of the experimental set up and the range and limitations of the technique are discussed.« less
  • A technique for preparing selenium films onto 50.8 microns thick beryllium foils is described. The selenium was deposited in vacuum from a resistance heated evaporation source. Profilometry measurements of the coatings indicate deposit thicknesses of 5.5, 12.9, 37.5, 49.8 and 74.5 microns. The control of deposition rate and of coating thickness was facilitated using a commercially available closed-loop programmable thin film controller. The x-ray transmission of the coated substrates was measured using a tritiated zirconium source. The transmissivities of the film/substrate combination are presented for the range of energies from 4 to 20 keV. 15 references, 3 figures.
  • Copper doped polymer shells can provide a very useful diagnostic for fast ignition experiments currently being performed at various laboratories around the world. The low concentration copper dopant acts as an efficient x-ray source providing information on the physics of fast ignition. We have developed copper doped glow discharge (GDP) coatings suitable for such purposes. Copper acetylacetonate (CuAcAC), a solid at room temperature, was used in a heated jacket as the dopant source. We used this technique to fabricate thin ({approx}5-7 {mu}m) GDP shells doped with {approx}1 at % copper through the depolymerizable mandrel process for fast ignition experiments. Themore » details of the experimental set up and the range and limitations of the technique are discussed.« less
  • Multilayer polymer/oxide coatings are being developed to protect sensitive organic display devices, such as OLEDs, from oxygen and water vapor permeation. The coatings have permeation levels ~ 10-6 g/m2/d for water vapor and ~10-6 cc/m2/d for oxygen, and are deposited by vacuum polymer technology. The coatings consist of either a base Al2O3 or acrylate polymer adhesion layer followed by alternating Al2O3/polymer layers. The polymer is used to decouple the 30 nm-thick Al2O3 barrier layers. Adhesion of the barrier coating to the substrate and display device is critical for the operating lifetime of the device. The substrate material could be anymore » transparent flexible plastic. The coating technology can also be used to encapsulate organic-based electronic devices to protect them from atmospheric degradation. Plasma pretreatment is also needed for good adhesion to the substrate, but if it is too aggressive, it will damage the organic display device. We report on the effects of plasma treatment on the adhesion of barrier coatings to plastic substrates and the performance of OLED devices after plasma treatment and barrier coating deposition. We find that initial OLED performance is not significantly affected by the deposition process and plasma treatment, as demonstrated by luminosity and I-V curves.« less