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Title: Technology Development and Field Monitoring in nZEB - US Country report IEA HPT Annex 49 Task 3

Abstract

The International Energy Agency (IEA) Heat Pumping Technologies (HPT) Annex 49, “Design and Integration of Heat Pumps for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings,” deals with the application of heat pumps (HPs) as a core component of the HVAC system for nearly or net-zero energy buildings. This report covers the Task 3 activities of the US team.Three institutions are involved on the US team and have worked on the following projects.•Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) summarized development activities since the conclusion of IEA HPT Annex 40 for several integrated HP (IHP) systems—electric ground-source IHP and air-source IHP versions and engine-driven AS-IHP version.•The University of Maryland partnered with ORNL and Blue Bear Management to develop a personal cooling device called RoCo that can provide personalized conditioned air to occupants in inadequately or unconditioned environments. With RoCo, building facility management can elevate the HVAC thermostat settings without compromising occupants’ thermal comfort. Researchers have found that a 4°F increase in thermostat settings can save 12–30% energy savings. Therefore, RoCo is a promising technology that can help reduce building energy consumption and facilitate achievement of net-zero energy building performance. •The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working on a field study effort on themore » NIST Net-Zero Energy Residential Test Facility. Two air-source split-system HPs were installed in a residential, net-zero energy home that was constructed as a laboratory on the NIST campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The first HP was a two-stage, 7 kW (2 ton), 15.8 seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), 9.05 heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) conventionally ducted system; the second HP was a variable-speed, 10.6 kW (3 ton), 14 SEER, 8.35 HSPF, high-velocity ducted system. These two systems operated side by side, using separate supply ducts and a common return duct, on a weekly alternating schedule to condition the home that was operated with very consistent simulated thermal loads. The team wanted to determine whether the high-velocity system could provide comparable energy-use efficiency to the conventional system. The results of this study showed that it did meet the required loads and had slightly greater efficiency; the average cooling coefficient of performance (COP) was (0.40 ± 0.11) higher, and the average heating COP was statistically equal. A new firmware was provided at the end of the heating season that greatly improved the performance of the high-velocity system; its average heating COP went from (1.8 ± 0.9) to (2.5 ± 1.1) at a 95% confidence level. The new firmware heating COP averaged (1.05 ± 0.23) higher than the old firmware over the same outdoor temperatures. The defrost performance is very different for these two systems, yet they consumed equivalent energy per HDD. The conventional system uses a timed-initiate, temperature-terminate algorithm with auxiliary electric resistive heating, whereas the high-velocity system uses calculated evaporator parameters with a hot-gas bypass before a full reverse-cycle defrost with no supplementary resistive heat.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Maryland, College Park
  3. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD
  4. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1665989
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2020/1604
IEA/HPT Annex 49
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Baxter, Van D., Abuheiba, Ahmad, Radermacher, Reinhard, Payne, W. Vance, Dougherty, Brian, Ling, Jiazhen, and Srebric, Jelena. Technology Development and Field Monitoring in nZEB - US Country report IEA HPT Annex 49 Task 3. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1665989.
Baxter, Van D., Abuheiba, Ahmad, Radermacher, Reinhard, Payne, W. Vance, Dougherty, Brian, Ling, Jiazhen, & Srebric, Jelena. Technology Development and Field Monitoring in nZEB - US Country report IEA HPT Annex 49 Task 3. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1665989
Baxter, Van D., Abuheiba, Ahmad, Radermacher, Reinhard, Payne, W. Vance, Dougherty, Brian, Ling, Jiazhen, and Srebric, Jelena. 2020. "Technology Development and Field Monitoring in nZEB - US Country report IEA HPT Annex 49 Task 3". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1665989. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1665989.
@article{osti_1665989,
title = {Technology Development and Field Monitoring in nZEB - US Country report IEA HPT Annex 49 Task 3},
author = {Baxter, Van D. and Abuheiba, Ahmad and Radermacher, Reinhard and Payne, W. Vance and Dougherty, Brian and Ling, Jiazhen and Srebric, Jelena},
abstractNote = {The International Energy Agency (IEA) Heat Pumping Technologies (HPT) Annex 49, “Design and Integration of Heat Pumps for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings,” deals with the application of heat pumps (HPs) as a core component of the HVAC system for nearly or net-zero energy buildings. This report covers the Task 3 activities of the US team.Three institutions are involved on the US team and have worked on the following projects.•Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) summarized development activities since the conclusion of IEA HPT Annex 40 for several integrated HP (IHP) systems—electric ground-source IHP and air-source IHP versions and engine-driven AS-IHP version.•The University of Maryland partnered with ORNL and Blue Bear Management to develop a personal cooling device called RoCo that can provide personalized conditioned air to occupants in inadequately or unconditioned environments. With RoCo, building facility management can elevate the HVAC thermostat settings without compromising occupants’ thermal comfort. Researchers have found that a 4°F increase in thermostat settings can save 12–30% energy savings. Therefore, RoCo is a promising technology that can help reduce building energy consumption and facilitate achievement of net-zero energy building performance. •The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working on a field study effort on the NIST Net-Zero Energy Residential Test Facility. Two air-source split-system HPs were installed in a residential, net-zero energy home that was constructed as a laboratory on the NIST campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The first HP was a two-stage, 7 kW (2 ton), 15.8 seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), 9.05 heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) conventionally ducted system; the second HP was a variable-speed, 10.6 kW (3 ton), 14 SEER, 8.35 HSPF, high-velocity ducted system. These two systems operated side by side, using separate supply ducts and a common return duct, on a weekly alternating schedule to condition the home that was operated with very consistent simulated thermal loads. The team wanted to determine whether the high-velocity system could provide comparable energy-use efficiency to the conventional system. The results of this study showed that it did meet the required loads and had slightly greater efficiency; the average cooling coefficient of performance (COP) was (0.40 ± 0.11) higher, and the average heating COP was statistically equal. A new firmware was provided at the end of the heating season that greatly improved the performance of the high-velocity system; its average heating COP went from (1.8 ± 0.9) to (2.5 ± 1.1) at a 95% confidence level. The new firmware heating COP averaged (1.05 ± 0.23) higher than the old firmware over the same outdoor temperatures. The defrost performance is very different for these two systems, yet they consumed equivalent energy per HDD. The conventional system uses a timed-initiate, temperature-terminate algorithm with auxiliary electric resistive heating, whereas the high-velocity system uses calculated evaporator parameters with a hot-gas bypass before a full reverse-cycle defrost with no supplementary resistive heat.},
doi = {10.2172/1665989},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1665989}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {7}
}