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Title: Tailoring Interfacial Interactions via Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles Improves Performance of Parts Created by 3D Printing

Abstract

Decorating nanoparticle surfaces with end-tethered chains provides a way to mediate interfacial interactions in polymer nanocomposites. Here, polymer-grafted nanoparticles are investigated for their impact on the performance of polymer structures created by fused filament fabrication (FFF). The nanoscale organization of poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted nanoparticles (PMMA- g-NPs) in PMMA matrices is examined via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS data indicate that all nanocomposites exhibit particle–particle interactions, indicating that nanoparticles are locally clustered. Additionally, increasing the loading level of PMMA- g-NPs produces modest changes in T g but significant increases in the complex viscosity and storage modulus, suggesting that the number density of entanglements between graft chains and the matrix polymer increases with increasing PMMA- g-NP content. Increasing the number density of entanglements and the formation of localized clusters manifest at the macroscale: Dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile testing show that FFF-printed PMMA- g-NPs/PMMA nanocomposites display a 65% increase in the Young’s modulus, 116% increase in the ultimate tensile strength, and a 120% increase in the storage modulus compared to parts printed with pure (unfilled) PMMA. This research effort highlights how interfacial engineering can be used to enhance interactions on the nanoscale and improve the macroscopic properties of parts printed by FFF.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6];  [4]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [8]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  2. Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  3. Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, United States
  4. Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, LLC, Kansas City, MO (United States)
  5. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS)
  6. Oak Ridge High School, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  7. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  8. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1659566
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; NA-0002839; AC02-06CH11357; CBET-1512221; CMMI-1740457
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Applied Polymer Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2637-6105
Publisher:
ACS Publications
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
3D printing; nanocomposites; nanoparticles; organic compounds; polymers; polymer grafting; polymer nanocomposite; small-angle X-ray scattering; thermomechanical properties; x-ray scattering

Citation Formats

Street, Dayton P., Mah, Adeline Huizhen, Ledford, William K., Patterson, Steven, Bergman, James A., Lokitz, Bradley S., Pickel, Deanna L., Messman, Jamie M., Stein, Gila E., and Kilbey, S. Michael. Tailoring Interfacial Interactions via Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles Improves Performance of Parts Created by 3D Printing. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1021/acsapm.9b01195.
Street, Dayton P., Mah, Adeline Huizhen, Ledford, William K., Patterson, Steven, Bergman, James A., Lokitz, Bradley S., Pickel, Deanna L., Messman, Jamie M., Stein, Gila E., & Kilbey, S. Michael. Tailoring Interfacial Interactions via Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles Improves Performance of Parts Created by 3D Printing. United States. doi:10.1021/acsapm.9b01195.
Street, Dayton P., Mah, Adeline Huizhen, Ledford, William K., Patterson, Steven, Bergman, James A., Lokitz, Bradley S., Pickel, Deanna L., Messman, Jamie M., Stein, Gila E., and Kilbey, S. Michael. Mon . "Tailoring Interfacial Interactions via Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles Improves Performance of Parts Created by 3D Printing". United States. doi:10.1021/acsapm.9b01195.
@article{osti_1659566,
title = {Tailoring Interfacial Interactions via Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles Improves Performance of Parts Created by 3D Printing},
author = {Street, Dayton P. and Mah, Adeline Huizhen and Ledford, William K. and Patterson, Steven and Bergman, James A. and Lokitz, Bradley S. and Pickel, Deanna L. and Messman, Jamie M. and Stein, Gila E. and Kilbey, S. Michael},
abstractNote = {Decorating nanoparticle surfaces with end-tethered chains provides a way to mediate interfacial interactions in polymer nanocomposites. Here, polymer-grafted nanoparticles are investigated for their impact on the performance of polymer structures created by fused filament fabrication (FFF). The nanoscale organization of poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted nanoparticles (PMMA-g-NPs) in PMMA matrices is examined via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS data indicate that all nanocomposites exhibit particle–particle interactions, indicating that nanoparticles are locally clustered. Additionally, increasing the loading level of PMMA-g-NPs produces modest changes in Tg but significant increases in the complex viscosity and storage modulus, suggesting that the number density of entanglements between graft chains and the matrix polymer increases with increasing PMMA-g-NP content. Increasing the number density of entanglements and the formation of localized clusters manifest at the macroscale: Dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile testing show that FFF-printed PMMA-g-NPs/PMMA nanocomposites display a 65% increase in the Young’s modulus, 116% increase in the ultimate tensile strength, and a 120% increase in the storage modulus compared to parts printed with pure (unfilled) PMMA. This research effort highlights how interfacial engineering can be used to enhance interactions on the nanoscale and improve the macroscopic properties of parts printed by FFF.},
doi = {10.1021/acsapm.9b01195},
journal = {ACS Applied Polymer Materials},
issn = {2637-6105},
number = 3,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
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