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Title: Landfill gas collection and groundwater protection

Abstract

Landfill Gas (LFG) has been identified as a major source of contamination of groundwater underlying landfills. Contaminants consist primarily of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as methylene chloride, trichloroethene, and tetrachloroethene. Three mechanisms for vapor phase VOC migration from a landfill to groundwater are predominant. These are: (1) Direct contact of landfill gas containing VOCs with groundwater, (2) Vapor phase VOC migration through the unsaturated zone surrounding a landfill, and (3) LFG Condensate water formation in the unsaturated zone and subsequent migration to groundwater. Current LFG collection practices are not geared towards controlling the potential for groundwater contamination caused by LFG. By not recognizing this major source of contamination, landfill operators are missing a major opportunity to reduce costs and minimize future liability of future groundwater impacts. Existing or future LFG collection systems can be upgraded, augmented with unsaturated zone remediation, or collection system operations modified to significantly reduce the potential for VOC contamination of groundwater.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Gas Control Engineering, Anaheim, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
161794
Report Number(s):
CONF-950978-
TRN: 95:008718-0037
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 18. international Madison waste conference: where are we going?, Madison, WI (United States), 20-21 Sep 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the eighteenth international Madison waste conference - municipal & industrial waste; PB: 461 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GROUND WATER; MONITORING; SANITARY LANDFILLS; POLLUTION CONTROL; CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; METHYLENE CHLORIDE; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; WASTE DISPOSAL; GASES; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; LEACHATES

Citation Formats

Janechek, A., and Prosser, R. Landfill gas collection and groundwater protection. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Janechek, A., & Prosser, R. Landfill gas collection and groundwater protection. United States.
Janechek, A., and Prosser, R. Sun . "Landfill gas collection and groundwater protection". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_161794,
title = {Landfill gas collection and groundwater protection},
author = {Janechek, A. and Prosser, R.},
abstractNote = {Landfill Gas (LFG) has been identified as a major source of contamination of groundwater underlying landfills. Contaminants consist primarily of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as methylene chloride, trichloroethene, and tetrachloroethene. Three mechanisms for vapor phase VOC migration from a landfill to groundwater are predominant. These are: (1) Direct contact of landfill gas containing VOCs with groundwater, (2) Vapor phase VOC migration through the unsaturated zone surrounding a landfill, and (3) LFG Condensate water formation in the unsaturated zone and subsequent migration to groundwater. Current LFG collection practices are not geared towards controlling the potential for groundwater contamination caused by LFG. By not recognizing this major source of contamination, landfill operators are missing a major opportunity to reduce costs and minimize future liability of future groundwater impacts. Existing or future LFG collection systems can be upgraded, augmented with unsaturated zone remediation, or collection system operations modified to significantly reduce the potential for VOC contamination of groundwater.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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