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Title: DOE DE-FG02-07ER46417 Grant Final Technical Report: Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures – Phase-Field Modeling

Abstract

Domain pattern formation is one of the most common phenomena in nature and is a topic of immense interest in many fields ranging from materials science and physics to chemistry and biology. This DOE sponsored research project explored the basic science concerning the thermodynamic stability of mesoscale polarization domain patterns and their temporal evolution mechanisms during formation and subsequent switching in ferroelectric nanostructures and heterostructures. The project employed the computational phase-field method in combination of microelasticity and electrostatic theories. The research was carried out in close collaboration with a number of experimental groups who used High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), in situ TEM with Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), or Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) to characterize the domain structures and dynamics of ferroelectric thin films and heterostructures and who grow high-quality ferroelectric and multiferroic thin films using advanced growth techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLLD), and sputtering. The research efforts of the project help establish the phase-field method as the most powerful method for understanding and predicting domain structures in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures. The findings of the project led to the basic understanding of stability and switching mechanisms of ferroelectric domains under differentmore » mechanical boundary conditions and under either homogeneous capacitor configurations or local fields using metallic probes as electrodes and the emergence of charged domain walls during domain switching. The project predicted the spatial length scales, temperature ranges, and electromechanical conditions for different polar states in heterostructures and guided the discovery of both transient and stable novel polarization states containing vortex lattices in oxide superlattices. The project resulted in 134 journal publications and 6 PhD theses with all the PhD graduates currently working in either academia or industry within the United States. The basic understanding on the stability of mesoscale polar states and pattern evolution achieved by the project improved our ability to control and engineer properties of ferroelectric thin films and heterostructures for potential applications in nanoscale electronic devices.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
1616792
Report Number(s):
DOE-PennState-46417
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-07ER46417
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Ferroelectrics, Domain Structures, Phase-field Method

Citation Formats

Chen, Long-Qing, Cheng, Xiaoxing, and Zorn, Jacob. DOE DE-FG02-07ER46417 Grant Final Technical Report: Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures – Phase-Field Modeling. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1616792.
Chen, Long-Qing, Cheng, Xiaoxing, & Zorn, Jacob. DOE DE-FG02-07ER46417 Grant Final Technical Report: Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures – Phase-Field Modeling. United States. doi:10.2172/1616792.
Chen, Long-Qing, Cheng, Xiaoxing, and Zorn, Jacob. Fri . "DOE DE-FG02-07ER46417 Grant Final Technical Report: Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures – Phase-Field Modeling". United States. doi:10.2172/1616792. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1616792.
@article{osti_1616792,
title = {DOE DE-FG02-07ER46417 Grant Final Technical Report: Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures – Phase-Field Modeling},
author = {Chen, Long-Qing and Cheng, Xiaoxing and Zorn, Jacob},
abstractNote = {Domain pattern formation is one of the most common phenomena in nature and is a topic of immense interest in many fields ranging from materials science and physics to chemistry and biology. This DOE sponsored research project explored the basic science concerning the thermodynamic stability of mesoscale polarization domain patterns and their temporal evolution mechanisms during formation and subsequent switching in ferroelectric nanostructures and heterostructures. The project employed the computational phase-field method in combination of microelasticity and electrostatic theories. The research was carried out in close collaboration with a number of experimental groups who used High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), in situ TEM with Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), or Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) to characterize the domain structures and dynamics of ferroelectric thin films and heterostructures and who grow high-quality ferroelectric and multiferroic thin films using advanced growth techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLLD), and sputtering. The research efforts of the project help establish the phase-field method as the most powerful method for understanding and predicting domain structures in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures. The findings of the project led to the basic understanding of stability and switching mechanisms of ferroelectric domains under different mechanical boundary conditions and under either homogeneous capacitor configurations or local fields using metallic probes as electrodes and the emergence of charged domain walls during domain switching. The project predicted the spatial length scales, temperature ranges, and electromechanical conditions for different polar states in heterostructures and guided the discovery of both transient and stable novel polarization states containing vortex lattices in oxide superlattices. The project resulted in 134 journal publications and 6 PhD theses with all the PhD graduates currently working in either academia or industry within the United States. The basic understanding on the stability of mesoscale polar states and pattern evolution achieved by the project improved our ability to control and engineer properties of ferroelectric thin films and heterostructures for potential applications in nanoscale electronic devices.},
doi = {10.2172/1616792},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {5}
}