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Title: Cements with supplementary cementitious materials for high-temperature geothermal wells

Abstract

This paper discusses self-healing ability, characterized by the strength recovery and crack sealing, thermal shock and acid resistance of several cementitious composites in water, alkali carbonate or geothermal brine at 300 °C. The tested formulations included a common high-temperature OPC/SiO 2 formulation, a calcium-aluminate cement with alkali activated FAF blend (TSRC), alkali-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS/SiO 2) and fly ash C/fly ash F (FAC/FAF) cementitious blends. Compressive strength recoveries and visual observations of cracks sealing using 3D imaging after the compressive damage and then after the 5-day healing period were used to evaluate the self-healing abilities of these composites. The strength recoveries were evaluated for composites after 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-, and 30- day initial curing periods at 300 °C and after repeated damage and 5-day healing treatments. The nature of the failure was classified depending on the Young’s modulus (YM) of the tested blends. Composites with moderate values of YM, such as OPC/SiO 2 and TSRC developed slim cracks while brittle and very brittle FAC/FAF and GBFS/SiO 2 cementitious blends produced multidirectional cracks or near-fragment failures resulting in poor strength recoveries. In comparison with the common high-temperature OPC/SiO 2 blend, composites with alkali activated pozzolanic materials demonstrated amore » decrease in crack size during the short healing periods. Fly ash-containing composites showed better acid resistance surviving 28 days in sulfuric acid (pH 0.2) at 90 °C. The TSRC demonstrated the best thermal shock resistance losing only about 20 % of the original strength in five 350 °C heat→25 °C water thermal cycles. In all the tests the TSRC outperformed the rest of the composites with average strength recoveries of more than 85 %. Alkali carbonate was the most favorable for both strength recovery and crack sealing. The short-term strength recoveries could be further improved to above 100 % by addition of micro-glass fibers (MGF). However, the MGF raised the brittleness of the samples after longer initial curing times, which decreased recovery rates of the aged samples. Crystalline phase analysis demonstrated that different products assisted in strength recoveries and crack sealing. The later included for the most part silica and analcime while the former were hydrogrossulars (ferrian) with various stoichiometries, iron-magnesium minerals, cancrinite, quartz and boehmite. These phases formed thanks to the slow high-temperature alkaline reactions of fly ash and glass fibers for MGF-modified samples.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
OSTI Identifier:
1616776
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1635485
Report Number(s):
BNL-216051-2020-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 0375-6505; S0375650519303621; 101840; PII: S0375650519303621
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Geothermics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Geothermics Journal Volume: 86 Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0375-6505
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

Citation Formats

Pyatina, Tatiana, and Sugama, Toshifumi. Cements with supplementary cementitious materials for high-temperature geothermal wells. United Kingdom: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2020.101840.
Pyatina, Tatiana, & Sugama, Toshifumi. Cements with supplementary cementitious materials for high-temperature geothermal wells. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2020.101840.
Pyatina, Tatiana, and Sugama, Toshifumi. Wed . "Cements with supplementary cementitious materials for high-temperature geothermal wells". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2020.101840.
@article{osti_1616776,
title = {Cements with supplementary cementitious materials for high-temperature geothermal wells},
author = {Pyatina, Tatiana and Sugama, Toshifumi},
abstractNote = {This paper discusses self-healing ability, characterized by the strength recovery and crack sealing, thermal shock and acid resistance of several cementitious composites in water, alkali carbonate or geothermal brine at 300 °C. The tested formulations included a common high-temperature OPC/SiO2 formulation, a calcium-aluminate cement with alkali activated FAF blend (TSRC), alkali-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS/SiO2) and fly ash C/fly ash F (FAC/FAF) cementitious blends. Compressive strength recoveries and visual observations of cracks sealing using 3D imaging after the compressive damage and then after the 5-day healing period were used to evaluate the self-healing abilities of these composites. The strength recoveries were evaluated for composites after 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-, and 30- day initial curing periods at 300 °C and after repeated damage and 5-day healing treatments. The nature of the failure was classified depending on the Young’s modulus (YM) of the tested blends. Composites with moderate values of YM, such as OPC/SiO2 and TSRC developed slim cracks while brittle and very brittle FAC/FAF and GBFS/SiO2 cementitious blends produced multidirectional cracks or near-fragment failures resulting in poor strength recoveries. In comparison with the common high-temperature OPC/SiO2 blend, composites with alkali activated pozzolanic materials demonstrated a decrease in crack size during the short healing periods. Fly ash-containing composites showed better acid resistance surviving 28 days in sulfuric acid (pH 0.2) at 90 °C. The TSRC demonstrated the best thermal shock resistance losing only about 20 % of the original strength in five 350 °C heat→25 °C water thermal cycles. In all the tests the TSRC outperformed the rest of the composites with average strength recoveries of more than 85 %. Alkali carbonate was the most favorable for both strength recovery and crack sealing. The short-term strength recoveries could be further improved to above 100 % by addition of micro-glass fibers (MGF). However, the MGF raised the brittleness of the samples after longer initial curing times, which decreased recovery rates of the aged samples. Crystalline phase analysis demonstrated that different products assisted in strength recoveries and crack sealing. The later included for the most part silica and analcime while the former were hydrogrossulars (ferrian) with various stoichiometries, iron-magnesium minerals, cancrinite, quartz and boehmite. These phases formed thanks to the slow high-temperature alkaline reactions of fly ash and glass fibers for MGF-modified samples.},
doi = {10.1016/j.geothermics.2020.101840},
journal = {Geothermics},
issn = {0375-6505},
number = C,
volume = 86,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2020},
month = {7}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.geothermics.2020.101840

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