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Title: Basic Research Needs Workshop on Synthesis Science for Energy Relevant Technology

Abstract

The technology that lies at our fingertips becomes more powerful each day. Smartphones connect us instantly to family, friends, and co-workers around the globe; give us access to a limitless stream of information; control the heating in our homes; and serve as our cameras, calculators, flashlights, music players, boarding passes and, on occasion, our phones. Cars are ever more fuel-efficient, safer, semi-autonomous, and have more computing power than the systems that guided humankind to the moon. LED lighting and solar panels are becoming commonplace, replacing less efficient technologies and expanding the energy options available worldwide. Novel polymers and nanoparticles are playing a crucial role in enhanced oil recovery. None of these advances would have been possible without the discovery and development of, and ability to create, new materials and chemical processes. Now imagine what our world would be like if we could accelerate those discoveries a thousandfold. What if the only limit to synthesizing new forms of matter were the imagination? We could build complex assemblies of atoms and molecules with architectures and capabilities far exceeding those of materials found in nature—for example, develop catalysts that turn garbage into fuels, design solar cells to power our homes directly from sunlight,more » make batteries with the energy density of gasoline, and create one- and two-dimensional solids that transport charge hundreds of times faster than silicon or allow us to build quantum bits based on the spins of electrons or photons to realize the promise of “beyond Moore’s law” computing. Advances in synthesis science are required to bring about this future—we not only must know how to design new molecules and materials with desired functions and properties through theory and computational techniques; we also must be able to make the materials we envision. New approaches to discovering as yet unimagined matter require a sea change in the way we think about the science of synthesis. Chemical and materials sciences have traditionally focused on understanding structure–function relationships with the goal of predicting where the atoms should be placed to achieve a targeted property or process. Much less effort has been directed toward a predictive science of synthesis—understanding how to get the atoms where they need to go to achieve the desired structure. This report, which is the result of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Synthesis Science for Energy Technologies, lays out the scientific challenges and opportunities in synthesis science. The workshop was attended by more than 100 leading national and international scientific experts. Its five topical and two crosscutting panels identified four priority research directions (PRDs) for realizing the vision of predictive, science-directed synthesis.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [3];  [15];  [15];  [15];  [16];  [17] more »;  [15];  [18] « less
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  4. Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)
  5. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
  6. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)
  7. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  8. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
  9. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  10. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
  11. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  12. Univ. of Limerick (Ireland)
  13. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)
  14. Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States)
  15. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Basic Energy Sciences. Materials Sciences and Engineering
  16. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Basic Energy Sciences. Scientific User Facilities
  17. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Basic Energy Sciences. Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences
  18. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Basic Energy Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC) (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
OSTI Identifier:
1616513
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Citation Formats

De Yoreo, Jim, Mandrus, David, Soderholm, Lynda, Forbes, Tori, Kanatzidis, Mercouri, Erlebacher, Jonah, Laskin, Julia, Wiesner, Uli, Xu, Ting, Billinge, Simon, Tolbert, Sarah, Zaworotko, Michael, Galli, Giulia, Chan, Julia, Mitchell, John, Horton, Linda, Kini, Arvind, Gersten, Bonnie, Maracas, George, Miranda, Raul, Pechan, Mick, and Runkles, Katie. Basic Research Needs Workshop on Synthesis Science for Energy Relevant Technology. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1616513.
De Yoreo, Jim, Mandrus, David, Soderholm, Lynda, Forbes, Tori, Kanatzidis, Mercouri, Erlebacher, Jonah, Laskin, Julia, Wiesner, Uli, Xu, Ting, Billinge, Simon, Tolbert, Sarah, Zaworotko, Michael, Galli, Giulia, Chan, Julia, Mitchell, John, Horton, Linda, Kini, Arvind, Gersten, Bonnie, Maracas, George, Miranda, Raul, Pechan, Mick, & Runkles, Katie. Basic Research Needs Workshop on Synthesis Science for Energy Relevant Technology. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1616513
De Yoreo, Jim, Mandrus, David, Soderholm, Lynda, Forbes, Tori, Kanatzidis, Mercouri, Erlebacher, Jonah, Laskin, Julia, Wiesner, Uli, Xu, Ting, Billinge, Simon, Tolbert, Sarah, Zaworotko, Michael, Galli, Giulia, Chan, Julia, Mitchell, John, Horton, Linda, Kini, Arvind, Gersten, Bonnie, Maracas, George, Miranda, Raul, Pechan, Mick, and Runkles, Katie. 2016. "Basic Research Needs Workshop on Synthesis Science for Energy Relevant Technology". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1616513. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1616513.
@article{osti_1616513,
title = {Basic Research Needs Workshop on Synthesis Science for Energy Relevant Technology},
author = {De Yoreo, Jim and Mandrus, David and Soderholm, Lynda and Forbes, Tori and Kanatzidis, Mercouri and Erlebacher, Jonah and Laskin, Julia and Wiesner, Uli and Xu, Ting and Billinge, Simon and Tolbert, Sarah and Zaworotko, Michael and Galli, Giulia and Chan, Julia and Mitchell, John and Horton, Linda and Kini, Arvind and Gersten, Bonnie and Maracas, George and Miranda, Raul and Pechan, Mick and Runkles, Katie},
abstractNote = {The technology that lies at our fingertips becomes more powerful each day. Smartphones connect us instantly to family, friends, and co-workers around the globe; give us access to a limitless stream of information; control the heating in our homes; and serve as our cameras, calculators, flashlights, music players, boarding passes and, on occasion, our phones. Cars are ever more fuel-efficient, safer, semi-autonomous, and have more computing power than the systems that guided humankind to the moon. LED lighting and solar panels are becoming commonplace, replacing less efficient technologies and expanding the energy options available worldwide. Novel polymers and nanoparticles are playing a crucial role in enhanced oil recovery. None of these advances would have been possible without the discovery and development of, and ability to create, new materials and chemical processes. Now imagine what our world would be like if we could accelerate those discoveries a thousandfold. What if the only limit to synthesizing new forms of matter were the imagination? We could build complex assemblies of atoms and molecules with architectures and capabilities far exceeding those of materials found in nature—for example, develop catalysts that turn garbage into fuels, design solar cells to power our homes directly from sunlight, make batteries with the energy density of gasoline, and create one- and two-dimensional solids that transport charge hundreds of times faster than silicon or allow us to build quantum bits based on the spins of electrons or photons to realize the promise of “beyond Moore’s law” computing. Advances in synthesis science are required to bring about this future—we not only must know how to design new molecules and materials with desired functions and properties through theory and computational techniques; we also must be able to make the materials we envision. New approaches to discovering as yet unimagined matter require a sea change in the way we think about the science of synthesis. Chemical and materials sciences have traditionally focused on understanding structure–function relationships with the goal of predicting where the atoms should be placed to achieve a targeted property or process. Much less effort has been directed toward a predictive science of synthesis—understanding how to get the atoms where they need to go to achieve the desired structure. This report, which is the result of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Synthesis Science for Energy Technologies, lays out the scientific challenges and opportunities in synthesis science. The workshop was attended by more than 100 leading national and international scientific experts. Its five topical and two crosscutting panels identified four priority research directions (PRDs) for realizing the vision of predictive, science-directed synthesis.},
doi = {10.2172/1616513},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1616513}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {5}
}