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Title: Basic Research Needs for Catalysis Science to Transform Energy Technologies: Report from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Workshop May 8–10, 2017, in Gaithersburg, Maryland

Abstract

Energy technologies affect virtually every aspect of life in modern societies—including transportation, utilities, agriculture, medicine, and the availability of a myriad of consumer products—and depend on human ability to accelerate and to guide chemical transformations. Controlling these transformations, which occur in the microscopic world of atoms and molecules, forms the basis of countless technologies such as production of fuels, fertilizers, plastics, pharmaceuticals and much more. At the very core of these chemical transformations are catalysts—specialized and often highly complex types of matter that allow chemical reactions to occur rapidly and produce specific products. Catalysts also have the remarkable ability to perform their tasks millions of times without themselves being consumed. The discovery of inexpensive and widely-deployable energy and chemical technologies, and their underpinning catalysis science, is critical to ensure the economic viability of U.S. energy and chemical industries. Over the past decade, remarkable new tools have been discovered that allow the observation of catalytic transformations in exquisite detail, and assembly of novel and elaborate catalytic architectures with atomic precision. Furthermore, increasingly sophisticated theoretical and computational tools allow understanding of the essential details of the catalytic processes, and this overall progress has led to the discovery of catalysts with superior performancemore » and the associated economic benefit. In the next decade and beyond, science promises to revolutionize how catalysts and catalytic processes are designed, to enable the introduction of new energy resources, to provide routes to sustainable synthesis of chemicals and other valuable materials, and to create novel approaches to chemical energy storage. This report is the result of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Catalysis Science to Transform Energy Technologies that was held in May 2017, and was attended by more than 100 leading national and international scientific experts. The attendees were organized into four panels: 1. Diversified Energy Feedstocks and Carriers, 2. Novel Approaches to Energy Transformations, 3. Advanced Chemical Conversion Approaches, and 4. Crosscutting Capabilities and Challenges: Synthesis, Theory, and Characterization. The workshop identified five priority research directions (PRDs) that are aimed at harnessing complexity in catalysis to create next-generation energy technologies and realizing efficient catalytic processes to increase the diversity of resources for production of chemicals and energy.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [15];  [16];  [17];  [7];  [18];  [19] more »;  [20];  [20];  [20];  [20];  [20];  [20];  [20];  [12];  [12];  [12];  [6];  [21];  [22];  [21];  [23];  [24];  [6];  [25];  [16];  [26];  [27];  [28];  [6];  [29];  [30];  [6];  [31];  [12];  [12];  [6];  [32];  [12];  [12];  [12];  [33];  [6];  [33];  [33];  [6];  [6] « less
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)
  3. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)
  4. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
  5. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  7. Stanford Univ., CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  8. Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)
  9. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)
  10. Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)
  11. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)
  12. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  13. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  14. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
  15. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  16. Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)
  17. Shell International Exploration and Production, Houston, TX (United States)
  18. Honeywell UOP, Des Plaines, IL (United States)
  19. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
  20. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Basic Energy Sciences
  21. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  22. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  23. Trinity Univ., San Antonio, TX (United States)
  24. Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)
  25. California Institute of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)
  26. Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  27. Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  28. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
  29. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
  30. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
  31. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  32. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  33. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC) (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1616260
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Koval, Carl A., Lercher, Johannes, Scott, Susannah L., Coates, Geoffrey W., Iglesia, Enrique, Bullock, R. Morris, Jaramillo, Thomas F., Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria, Resasco, Daniel, Tway, Cathy L., Batista, Victor, Chapman, Karena W., Dai, Sheng, Dumesic, James, Friend, Cynthia, Hille, Russ, Johnson, Kim, Nørskov, Jens, Rekoske, Jim, Sarkar, Reuben, Bradley, Christopher, Garrett, Bruce, Henderson, Craig, Miranda, Raul, Peden, Charles, Schwartz, Viviane, Runkles, Katie, Fellner, Karen, Jenks, Cynthia, Nelson, Michele, Appel, Aaron M., Bare, Simon, Bartlett, Bart M., Bligaard, Thomas, Chandler, Bert D., Davis, Robert J., Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra, Gregoire, John, Hille, Russ, Hock, Adam S., Kitchin, John, Kung, Harold H., Rousseau, Roger, Sadow, Aaron D., Schaak, Raymond E., Shaw, Wendy J., Stacchiola, Dario J., Delferro, Max, Bunel, Emilio, Holladay, John, Houle, Frances, Jenks, Cynthia, Krause, Ted, Marshall, Chris, Neale, Nathan, Parks, James, Schaidle, Joshua, VandeLagemaat, Jao, Wang, Yong, and Weber, Robert. Basic Research Needs for Catalysis Science to Transform Energy Technologies: Report from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Workshop May 8–10, 2017, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1616260.
Koval, Carl A., Lercher, Johannes, Scott, Susannah L., Coates, Geoffrey W., Iglesia, Enrique, Bullock, R. Morris, Jaramillo, Thomas F., Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria, Resasco, Daniel, Tway, Cathy L., Batista, Victor, Chapman, Karena W., Dai, Sheng, Dumesic, James, Friend, Cynthia, Hille, Russ, Johnson, Kim, Nørskov, Jens, Rekoske, Jim, Sarkar, Reuben, Bradley, Christopher, Garrett, Bruce, Henderson, Craig, Miranda, Raul, Peden, Charles, Schwartz, Viviane, Runkles, Katie, Fellner, Karen, Jenks, Cynthia, Nelson, Michele, Appel, Aaron M., Bare, Simon, Bartlett, Bart M., Bligaard, Thomas, Chandler, Bert D., Davis, Robert J., Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra, Gregoire, John, Hille, Russ, Hock, Adam S., Kitchin, John, Kung, Harold H., Rousseau, Roger, Sadow, Aaron D., Schaak, Raymond E., Shaw, Wendy J., Stacchiola, Dario J., Delferro, Max, Bunel, Emilio, Holladay, John, Houle, Frances, Jenks, Cynthia, Krause, Ted, Marshall, Chris, Neale, Nathan, Parks, James, Schaidle, Joshua, VandeLagemaat, Jao, Wang, Yong, & Weber, Robert. Basic Research Needs for Catalysis Science to Transform Energy Technologies: Report from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Workshop May 8–10, 2017, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. United States. doi:10.2172/1616260.
Koval, Carl A., Lercher, Johannes, Scott, Susannah L., Coates, Geoffrey W., Iglesia, Enrique, Bullock, R. Morris, Jaramillo, Thomas F., Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria, Resasco, Daniel, Tway, Cathy L., Batista, Victor, Chapman, Karena W., Dai, Sheng, Dumesic, James, Friend, Cynthia, Hille, Russ, Johnson, Kim, Nørskov, Jens, Rekoske, Jim, Sarkar, Reuben, Bradley, Christopher, Garrett, Bruce, Henderson, Craig, Miranda, Raul, Peden, Charles, Schwartz, Viviane, Runkles, Katie, Fellner, Karen, Jenks, Cynthia, Nelson, Michele, Appel, Aaron M., Bare, Simon, Bartlett, Bart M., Bligaard, Thomas, Chandler, Bert D., Davis, Robert J., Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra, Gregoire, John, Hille, Russ, Hock, Adam S., Kitchin, John, Kung, Harold H., Rousseau, Roger, Sadow, Aaron D., Schaak, Raymond E., Shaw, Wendy J., Stacchiola, Dario J., Delferro, Max, Bunel, Emilio, Holladay, John, Houle, Frances, Jenks, Cynthia, Krause, Ted, Marshall, Chris, Neale, Nathan, Parks, James, Schaidle, Joshua, VandeLagemaat, Jao, Wang, Yong, and Weber, Robert. Mon . "Basic Research Needs for Catalysis Science to Transform Energy Technologies: Report from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Workshop May 8–10, 2017, in Gaithersburg, Maryland". United States. doi:10.2172/1616260. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1616260.
@article{osti_1616260,
title = {Basic Research Needs for Catalysis Science to Transform Energy Technologies: Report from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Workshop May 8–10, 2017, in Gaithersburg, Maryland},
author = {Koval, Carl A. and Lercher, Johannes and Scott, Susannah L. and Coates, Geoffrey W. and Iglesia, Enrique and Bullock, R. Morris and Jaramillo, Thomas F. and Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria and Resasco, Daniel and Tway, Cathy L. and Batista, Victor and Chapman, Karena W. and Dai, Sheng and Dumesic, James and Friend, Cynthia and Hille, Russ and Johnson, Kim and Nørskov, Jens and Rekoske, Jim and Sarkar, Reuben and Bradley, Christopher and Garrett, Bruce and Henderson, Craig and Miranda, Raul and Peden, Charles and Schwartz, Viviane and Runkles, Katie and Fellner, Karen and Jenks, Cynthia and Nelson, Michele and Appel, Aaron M. and Bare, Simon and Bartlett, Bart M. and Bligaard, Thomas and Chandler, Bert D. and Davis, Robert J. and Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra and Gregoire, John and Hille, Russ and Hock, Adam S. and Kitchin, John and Kung, Harold H. and Rousseau, Roger and Sadow, Aaron D. and Schaak, Raymond E. and Shaw, Wendy J. and Stacchiola, Dario J. and Delferro, Max and Bunel, Emilio and Holladay, John and Houle, Frances and Jenks, Cynthia and Krause, Ted and Marshall, Chris and Neale, Nathan and Parks, James and Schaidle, Joshua and VandeLagemaat, Jao and Wang, Yong and Weber, Robert},
abstractNote = {Energy technologies affect virtually every aspect of life in modern societies—including transportation, utilities, agriculture, medicine, and the availability of a myriad of consumer products—and depend on human ability to accelerate and to guide chemical transformations. Controlling these transformations, which occur in the microscopic world of atoms and molecules, forms the basis of countless technologies such as production of fuels, fertilizers, plastics, pharmaceuticals and much more. At the very core of these chemical transformations are catalysts—specialized and often highly complex types of matter that allow chemical reactions to occur rapidly and produce specific products. Catalysts also have the remarkable ability to perform their tasks millions of times without themselves being consumed. The discovery of inexpensive and widely-deployable energy and chemical technologies, and their underpinning catalysis science, is critical to ensure the economic viability of U.S. energy and chemical industries. Over the past decade, remarkable new tools have been discovered that allow the observation of catalytic transformations in exquisite detail, and assembly of novel and elaborate catalytic architectures with atomic precision. Furthermore, increasingly sophisticated theoretical and computational tools allow understanding of the essential details of the catalytic processes, and this overall progress has led to the discovery of catalysts with superior performance and the associated economic benefit. In the next decade and beyond, science promises to revolutionize how catalysts and catalytic processes are designed, to enable the introduction of new energy resources, to provide routes to sustainable synthesis of chemicals and other valuable materials, and to create novel approaches to chemical energy storage. This report is the result of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Catalysis Science to Transform Energy Technologies that was held in May 2017, and was attended by more than 100 leading national and international scientific experts. The attendees were organized into four panels: 1. Diversified Energy Feedstocks and Carriers, 2. Novel Approaches to Energy Transformations, 3. Advanced Chemical Conversion Approaches, and 4. Crosscutting Capabilities and Challenges: Synthesis, Theory, and Characterization. The workshop identified five priority research directions (PRDs) that are aimed at harnessing complexity in catalysis to create next-generation energy technologies and realizing efficient catalytic processes to increase the diversity of resources for production of chemicals and energy.},
doi = {10.2172/1616260},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}