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Title: Low-Income Energy Affordability: Conclusions From A Literature Review

Abstract

This paper examines the persistent problem of high energy burdens among low-income households, based on a review of more than 180 publications that pointed to several promising opportunities to address energy affordability including inclusive solar programs, leveraged health care benefits, and behavioral economics. using an equity and affordability lens. Even after decades of weatherization and bill-payment programs, low-income households, on average, continue to spend a higher share of their income on electricity and natural gas bills than any other income group. Energy burden for low-income households is not declining, and it remains persistently high, particularly in the South, in rural America, among minority households, and those with children and elderly residents. On a per household basis, utility companies spend less on energy-efficiency programs for low-income households than for other income groups. In addition, government and utility programs that promote rooftop solar power, electric vehicles, and home energy storage are largely inaccessible to low-income households. Our review identifies promising opportunities to address energy affordability including inclusive solar programs, leveraged health care benefits, behavioral economics, data analytics, advanced information and communication technologies, and grid resiliency. Scalable approaches require linking implementing agencies, programs and policies to tackle the complex web of causes andmore » impacts on low-income households with high energy burdens.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]
  1. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. EMV Energy Solutions, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; Georgia Institute of Technology
OSTI Identifier:
1607178
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2019/1150
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Brown, Marilyn Ann, Soni, Anmol, Lapsa, Melissa Voss, and Southworth, Katie. Low-Income Energy Affordability: Conclusions From A Literature Review. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1607178.
Brown, Marilyn Ann, Soni, Anmol, Lapsa, Melissa Voss, & Southworth, Katie. Low-Income Energy Affordability: Conclusions From A Literature Review. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1607178
Brown, Marilyn Ann, Soni, Anmol, Lapsa, Melissa Voss, and Southworth, Katie. 2020. "Low-Income Energy Affordability: Conclusions From A Literature Review". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1607178. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1607178.
@article{osti_1607178,
title = {Low-Income Energy Affordability: Conclusions From A Literature Review},
author = {Brown, Marilyn Ann and Soni, Anmol and Lapsa, Melissa Voss and Southworth, Katie},
abstractNote = {This paper examines the persistent problem of high energy burdens among low-income households, based on a review of more than 180 publications that pointed to several promising opportunities to address energy affordability including inclusive solar programs, leveraged health care benefits, and behavioral economics. using an equity and affordability lens. Even after decades of weatherization and bill-payment programs, low-income households, on average, continue to spend a higher share of their income on electricity and natural gas bills than any other income group. Energy burden for low-income households is not declining, and it remains persistently high, particularly in the South, in rural America, among minority households, and those with children and elderly residents. On a per household basis, utility companies spend less on energy-efficiency programs for low-income households than for other income groups. In addition, government and utility programs that promote rooftop solar power, electric vehicles, and home energy storage are largely inaccessible to low-income households. Our review identifies promising opportunities to address energy affordability including inclusive solar programs, leveraged health care benefits, behavioral economics, data analytics, advanced information and communication technologies, and grid resiliency. Scalable approaches require linking implementing agencies, programs and policies to tackle the complex web of causes and impacts on low-income households with high energy burdens.},
doi = {10.2172/1607178},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1607178}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {3}
}