skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Roll-to-Roll Advanced Materials Manufacturing DOE Laboratory Collaboration - FY2019 Final Report

Abstract

R2R processing is used to manufacture a wide range of products for various applications which span many industrial business sectors. The overall R2R methodology has been in use for decades and this continuous technique traditionally involves deposition of material(s) onto moving webs, carriers or other continuous belt-fed or conveyor-based processes that enable successive steps to build a final version which serves to support the deposited materials. Established methods that typify R2R include tape casting, silk-screen printing, reel-to-reel vacuum deposition/coating and R2R lithography. Products supported by R2R manufacturing include micro-electronics, electro-chromic window films, PVs, fuel cells for energy conversion, battery electrodes for energy storage, and barrier and membrane materials. Due to innovation in materials and process equipment, high-quality yet very low-cost multilayer technologies have the potential to be manufactured on a very cost-competitive basis. To move energy-related products from high-cost niche applications to the commercial sector, a means must be available to enable manufacture of these products in a cost-competitive manner that is affordable. Fortunately, products such as fuel cells, thin- and mid-film PVs, batteries, electrochromic and piezoelectric films, water separation membranes, and other energy saving technologies readily lend themselves to manufacture using R2R approaches. However, more early-stage research is neededmore » to solve the challenge of linking the materials (particles, polymers, solvents, additives) used in ink and slurry formulations, though the ink processing, coating and drying processes, to the ultimate performance of the final R2R product, especially for a process that uses multiple layers of deposition to achieve the end product.To solve the problems associated with this R2R “Grand Challenge”, the R2R AMM DOE Laboratory Collaboration is executing a research program with outcomes that will ultimately link modeling, processing, metrology and defect detection tools, thereby directly relating the properties of constituent particles and processing conditions to the performance of final devices. The Collaboration team and their research efforts with industry involvement are illustrated schematically in Figure 1. This collaborative approach was designed to foster identification and development of materials and processes related to R2R for clean-energy materials development. Using computational and experimental capabilities by acknowledged subject matter experts within the supported National Laboratory system, this project leverages the capabilities and expertise at each of five national laboratories to further the development of multilayer technologies that will enable high-volume, cost-competitive platforms.Figure 1 The R2R AMM DOE Laboratory Collaboration team and major research efforts. Source: ORNLA typical R2R process has three steps: 1) mixing of particles and various constituents in a slurry, 2) coating of the ink/slurry mixture on a substrate, and 3) drying/curing and processing of the coating. Final performance of devices made via R2R processes is dependent on the active materials (e.g. electrochemical particles in battery or fuel cell electrodes) and the device structure that stems from the governing component interactions within the various steps. However, a fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and phenomena is still lacking, which is why industrial-scale R2R process development and manufacturing is still largely empirical in nature.The FY 2019 through FY 2021 program addresses aspects of the following two targets from the AMO Multi-Year Program Plan: •Target 8.1 Develop technologies to reduce the cost per manufactured throughput of continuous R2R manufacturing processes.oIncreasing throughput of R2R processes by 5 times for batteries (to 50 square feet per minute (50 ft2/min)) and capacitors and 10 times for printed electronics and the manufacture of other substrates and MEs used in support of these products.oDeveloping resolution capabilities to enable registration and alignment that will detect, align, and co-deposit multiple layers of coatings and print < 1-micron (1 µm) features using continuous process scalable for commercial production.oDeveloping scalable and reliable R2R processes for solution deposition of ultra-thin (<10 nm) films for active and passive materials. oDevelop in-line multilayer coating technology on thin films with yields greater than 95%.•Target 8.2 Develop in-line instrumentation tools that will evaluate the quality of single and multilayer materials in-process.oDeveloping in-line QC technologies and methodologies for real-time identification of defects and expected product properties “in-use/application” during continuous processing at all size-scales with a focus on the “micro” and “nano” scale traces, lines, and devicesoDeveloping technologies to increase the measurement frequency of surface rheology« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. ORNL
  2. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)
  3. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berekely, CA
  5. Energetics Incorporated
  6. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1606639
Report Number(s):
ORNL/SPR-2020/1443
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Daniel, Claus, Wood III, David, Krumdick, Gregory, Ulsh, Michael, Battaglia, Vince, Crowson, Fred, and Schunk, R. Roll-to-Roll Advanced Materials Manufacturing DOE Laboratory Collaboration - FY2019 Final Report. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1606639.
Daniel, Claus, Wood III, David, Krumdick, Gregory, Ulsh, Michael, Battaglia, Vince, Crowson, Fred, & Schunk, R. Roll-to-Roll Advanced Materials Manufacturing DOE Laboratory Collaboration - FY2019 Final Report. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1606639
Daniel, Claus, Wood III, David, Krumdick, Gregory, Ulsh, Michael, Battaglia, Vince, Crowson, Fred, and Schunk, R. Sun . "Roll-to-Roll Advanced Materials Manufacturing DOE Laboratory Collaboration - FY2019 Final Report". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1606639. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1606639.
@article{osti_1606639,
title = {Roll-to-Roll Advanced Materials Manufacturing DOE Laboratory Collaboration - FY2019 Final Report},
author = {Daniel, Claus and Wood III, David and Krumdick, Gregory and Ulsh, Michael and Battaglia, Vince and Crowson, Fred and Schunk, R.},
abstractNote = {R2R processing is used to manufacture a wide range of products for various applications which span many industrial business sectors. The overall R2R methodology has been in use for decades and this continuous technique traditionally involves deposition of material(s) onto moving webs, carriers or other continuous belt-fed or conveyor-based processes that enable successive steps to build a final version which serves to support the deposited materials. Established methods that typify R2R include tape casting, silk-screen printing, reel-to-reel vacuum deposition/coating and R2R lithography. Products supported by R2R manufacturing include micro-electronics, electro-chromic window films, PVs, fuel cells for energy conversion, battery electrodes for energy storage, and barrier and membrane materials. Due to innovation in materials and process equipment, high-quality yet very low-cost multilayer technologies have the potential to be manufactured on a very cost-competitive basis. To move energy-related products from high-cost niche applications to the commercial sector, a means must be available to enable manufacture of these products in a cost-competitive manner that is affordable. Fortunately, products such as fuel cells, thin- and mid-film PVs, batteries, electrochromic and piezoelectric films, water separation membranes, and other energy saving technologies readily lend themselves to manufacture using R2R approaches. However, more early-stage research is needed to solve the challenge of linking the materials (particles, polymers, solvents, additives) used in ink and slurry formulations, though the ink processing, coating and drying processes, to the ultimate performance of the final R2R product, especially for a process that uses multiple layers of deposition to achieve the end product.To solve the problems associated with this R2R “Grand Challenge”, the R2R AMM DOE Laboratory Collaboration is executing a research program with outcomes that will ultimately link modeling, processing, metrology and defect detection tools, thereby directly relating the properties of constituent particles and processing conditions to the performance of final devices. The Collaboration team and their research efforts with industry involvement are illustrated schematically in Figure 1. This collaborative approach was designed to foster identification and development of materials and processes related to R2R for clean-energy materials development. Using computational and experimental capabilities by acknowledged subject matter experts within the supported National Laboratory system, this project leverages the capabilities and expertise at each of five national laboratories to further the development of multilayer technologies that will enable high-volume, cost-competitive platforms.Figure 1 The R2R AMM DOE Laboratory Collaboration team and major research efforts. Source: ORNLA typical R2R process has three steps: 1) mixing of particles and various constituents in a slurry, 2) coating of the ink/slurry mixture on a substrate, and 3) drying/curing and processing of the coating. Final performance of devices made via R2R processes is dependent on the active materials (e.g. electrochemical particles in battery or fuel cell electrodes) and the device structure that stems from the governing component interactions within the various steps. However, a fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and phenomena is still lacking, which is why industrial-scale R2R process development and manufacturing is still largely empirical in nature.The FY 2019 through FY 2021 program addresses aspects of the following two targets from the AMO Multi-Year Program Plan: •Target 8.1 Develop technologies to reduce the cost per manufactured throughput of continuous R2R manufacturing processes.oIncreasing throughput of R2R processes by 5 times for batteries (to 50 square feet per minute (50 ft2/min)) and capacitors and 10 times for printed electronics and the manufacture of other substrates and MEs used in support of these products.oDeveloping resolution capabilities to enable registration and alignment that will detect, align, and co-deposit multiple layers of coatings and print < 1-micron (1 µm) features using continuous process scalable for commercial production.oDeveloping scalable and reliable R2R processes for solution deposition of ultra-thin (<10 nm) films for active and passive materials. oDevelop in-line multilayer coating technology on thin films with yields greater than 95%.•Target 8.2 Develop in-line instrumentation tools that will evaluate the quality of single and multilayer materials in-process.oDeveloping in-line QC technologies and methodologies for real-time identification of defects and expected product properties “in-use/application” during continuous processing at all size-scales with a focus on the “micro” and “nano” scale traces, lines, and devicesoDeveloping technologies to increase the measurement frequency of surface rheology},
doi = {10.2172/1606639},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1606639}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {3}
}