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Title: The Dark Energy Spectrographic Instrument (DESI) Corrector Assembly

Abstract

The specific research of the DESI project is to study in detail the expansion history of the Universe over the past 10 billion years. In order to do this, the project designed, fabricated, tested and commissioned the DESI instrument which has been deployed at the Mayall Telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Arizona. The DESI project was conducted by approximately 30 US and foreign national laboratories. Our CRADA with University College London (UCL) involved both research planning for eventual observing on the DESI telescope; and in the build of the optical corrector, a major part of the instrument. The key major goals of this CRADA were achieved. For survey planning, Drs. Lahav, Abdalla, Peiris, Pontzen and Dr. Farihi were all important contributors to the working groups to which they were assigned. Their modelling efforts, cosmological simulations, target selection and analyses of imaging surveys have been vital in the early planning for targets during commissioning. The major role UCL played in the development of the instrument was performed by Drs. Doel and Brooks. The optical corrector components were developed by scientists and engineers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. UCL was assigned themore » arduous responsibility for creating the instrumentation necessary to take all the separate components (lenses, cells, rings) and incorporate them, while precisely aligning the optics. Following that, they installed the corrector inside the barrel and shipped everything to the Mayall. It was a great success that the optical barrel arrived safely in good condition. Drs. Doel and Brooks were involved in every step of the fabrication and kept in constant contact with the LBNL DESI Project Manager and Project Director. They were extremely successful in their alignment, which was proved by early observations. First light on the telescope was achieved on October 22, 2020. The first spectrum was taken of a random star at zenith. Shortly thereafter, the telescope slewed to M33 and several spectra were taken there and later in the Persus nebula. It was a major accomplishment for the project.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Contributing Org.:
University College London
OSTI Identifier:
1605564
Report Number(s):
LBNL-2001277; AWD00000670
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Levi, Michael. The Dark Energy Spectrographic Instrument (DESI) Corrector Assembly. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1605564.
Levi, Michael. The Dark Energy Spectrographic Instrument (DESI) Corrector Assembly. United States. doi:10.2172/1605564.
Levi, Michael. Fri . "The Dark Energy Spectrographic Instrument (DESI) Corrector Assembly". United States. doi:10.2172/1605564. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1605564.
@article{osti_1605564,
title = {The Dark Energy Spectrographic Instrument (DESI) Corrector Assembly},
author = {Levi, Michael},
abstractNote = {The specific research of the DESI project is to study in detail the expansion history of the Universe over the past 10 billion years. In order to do this, the project designed, fabricated, tested and commissioned the DESI instrument which has been deployed at the Mayall Telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Arizona. The DESI project was conducted by approximately 30 US and foreign national laboratories. Our CRADA with University College London (UCL) involved both research planning for eventual observing on the DESI telescope; and in the build of the optical corrector, a major part of the instrument. The key major goals of this CRADA were achieved. For survey planning, Drs. Lahav, Abdalla, Peiris, Pontzen and Dr. Farihi were all important contributors to the working groups to which they were assigned. Their modelling efforts, cosmological simulations, target selection and analyses of imaging surveys have been vital in the early planning for targets during commissioning. The major role UCL played in the development of the instrument was performed by Drs. Doel and Brooks. The optical corrector components were developed by scientists and engineers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. UCL was assigned the arduous responsibility for creating the instrumentation necessary to take all the separate components (lenses, cells, rings) and incorporate them, while precisely aligning the optics. Following that, they installed the corrector inside the barrel and shipped everything to the Mayall. It was a great success that the optical barrel arrived safely in good condition. Drs. Doel and Brooks were involved in every step of the fabrication and kept in constant contact with the LBNL DESI Project Manager and Project Director. They were extremely successful in their alignment, which was proved by early observations. First light on the telescope was achieved on October 22, 2020. The first spectrum was taken of a random star at zenith. Shortly thereafter, the telescope slewed to M33 and several spectra were taken there and later in the Persus nebula. It was a major accomplishment for the project.},
doi = {10.2172/1605564},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {3}
}