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Title: Global methane emissions from coal mining to continue growing even with declining coal production

Abstract

This paper presents projections of global methane emissions from coal mining under different coal extraction scenarios and with increasing mining depth through 2100. The paper proposes an updated methodology for calculating fugitive emissions from coal mining, which accounts for coal extraction method, coal rank, and mining depth and uses evidence-based emissions factors. A detailed assessment shows that coal mining-related methane emissions in 2010 were higher than previous studies show. This study also uses a novel methodology for calculating methane emissions from abandoned coal mines and represents the first estimate of future global methane emissions from those mines. The results show that emissions from abandoned mines increase faster than those from active ones. Using coal production data from six integrated assessment models, this study shows that by 2100 methane emissions from active underground mines increase by a factor of 4, while emissions from abandoned mines increase by a factor of 8. Abandoned mine methane emissions continue through the century even with aggressive mitigation actions.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  2. Raven Ridge Resources
  3. US Environmental Protection Agency
  4. Ruby Canyon Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1604979
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-147476
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Cleaner Production
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 256
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
coal mine methane, abandoned coal mine methane, emission inventory, emission factors

Citation Formats

Kholod, Nazar, Evans, Meredydd, Pilcher, Raymond, Roshchanka, Volha, Ruiz, Felicia, Coté, Michael, and Collings, Ronald. Global methane emissions from coal mining to continue growing even with declining coal production. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.120489.
Kholod, Nazar, Evans, Meredydd, Pilcher, Raymond, Roshchanka, Volha, Ruiz, Felicia, Coté, Michael, & Collings, Ronald. Global methane emissions from coal mining to continue growing even with declining coal production. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.120489.
Kholod, Nazar, Evans, Meredydd, Pilcher, Raymond, Roshchanka, Volha, Ruiz, Felicia, Coté, Michael, and Collings, Ronald. Wed . "Global methane emissions from coal mining to continue growing even with declining coal production". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.120489.
@article{osti_1604979,
title = {Global methane emissions from coal mining to continue growing even with declining coal production},
author = {Kholod, Nazar and Evans, Meredydd and Pilcher, Raymond and Roshchanka, Volha and Ruiz, Felicia and Coté, Michael and Collings, Ronald},
abstractNote = {This paper presents projections of global methane emissions from coal mining under different coal extraction scenarios and with increasing mining depth through 2100. The paper proposes an updated methodology for calculating fugitive emissions from coal mining, which accounts for coal extraction method, coal rank, and mining depth and uses evidence-based emissions factors. A detailed assessment shows that coal mining-related methane emissions in 2010 were higher than previous studies show. This study also uses a novel methodology for calculating methane emissions from abandoned coal mines and represents the first estimate of future global methane emissions from those mines. The results show that emissions from abandoned mines increase faster than those from active ones. Using coal production data from six integrated assessment models, this study shows that by 2100 methane emissions from active underground mines increase by a factor of 4, while emissions from abandoned mines increase by a factor of 8. Abandoned mine methane emissions continue through the century even with aggressive mitigation actions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.120489},
journal = {Journal of Cleaner Production},
number = ,
volume = 256,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {5}
}