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Title: Preliminary Assessment of Potential for Wind Energy Technology on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Reservation.

Abstract

Wind energy can provide renewable and sustainable electricity to Native American reservations, including rural homes, and power schools and businesses on reservations. It can also provide tribes with a source of income and economic development. The purpose of this paper is to determine the potential for deploying community and utility- scale wind renewable technologies on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa tribal lands. Ideal areas for wind technology development were investigated based on annual wind resources, terrain, land usage, and other factors such as culturally sensitive sites. The result is a preliminary assessment of wind energy potential on Turtle Mountain lands, which can be used to justify further investigation and investment into determining the feasibility of future wind technology projects. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would first like to acknowledge the Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for providing the opportunity for me to participate in this internship program at Sandia National Laboratories. I'd like to thank Kade Ferris for his input on culturally sensitive sites. I'd also like to thank the experts from National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Oceti Sakowin Power Authority, who provided valuable input and advice. Finally, I want to thank my mentors Julius Yellowhair, Stanleymore » Atcitty, Dylan Moriarty, Gepetta Billie, and Sandra Begay.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Under Secretary (US)
OSTI Identifier:
1599702
Report Number(s):
SAND2020-1321
683717
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

LaVallie, Sarah. Preliminary Assessment of Potential for Wind Energy Technology on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Reservation.. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1599702.
LaVallie, Sarah. Preliminary Assessment of Potential for Wind Energy Technology on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Reservation.. United States. doi:10.2172/1599702.
LaVallie, Sarah. Wed . "Preliminary Assessment of Potential for Wind Energy Technology on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Reservation.". United States. doi:10.2172/1599702. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1599702.
@article{osti_1599702,
title = {Preliminary Assessment of Potential for Wind Energy Technology on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Reservation.},
author = {LaVallie, Sarah},
abstractNote = {Wind energy can provide renewable and sustainable electricity to Native American reservations, including rural homes, and power schools and businesses on reservations. It can also provide tribes with a source of income and economic development. The purpose of this paper is to determine the potential for deploying community and utility- scale wind renewable technologies on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa tribal lands. Ideal areas for wind technology development were investigated based on annual wind resources, terrain, land usage, and other factors such as culturally sensitive sites. The result is a preliminary assessment of wind energy potential on Turtle Mountain lands, which can be used to justify further investigation and investment into determining the feasibility of future wind technology projects. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would first like to acknowledge the Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for providing the opportunity for me to participate in this internship program at Sandia National Laboratories. I'd like to thank Kade Ferris for his input on culturally sensitive sites. I'd also like to thank the experts from National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Oceti Sakowin Power Authority, who provided valuable input and advice. Finally, I want to thank my mentors Julius Yellowhair, Stanley Atcitty, Dylan Moriarty, Gepetta Billie, and Sandra Begay.},
doi = {10.2172/1599702},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {1}
}