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Title: Time-Lapse Gravity Monitoring of CO2 Migration Based on Numerical Modeling of a Faulted Storage Complex

Abstract

In this study, the performance of both surface and borehole time-lapse gravity monitoring to detect CO2 leakage from a carbon storage site is evaluated. Several hypothetical scenarios of CO2 migration in a leaky fault, and thief zones at different depths at the Kimberlina site (California, USA) constitute the basis of the approach. The CO2 displacement is simulated using the TOUGH2 simulator applied to a detailed geological model of the site. The gravity responses to these CO2 plumes are simulated using forward modeling with sensors at ground surface and in vertical boreholes. Results of inversion on one scenario are also presented. The surface-based gravity responses obtained for the different leakage scenarios demonstrate that leakage can be detected at the surface in all the scenarios but the time to detection is highly variable (10 to 40 years) and dependent on the detection threshold considered. Borehole measurements of the vertical component of gravity provide excellent constrains in depth when they are located in proximity of the density anomaly associated with the presence of CO2, thus discriminating multiple leaks in different thief zones. Joint inversion of surface and borehole data can bring valuable information of the occurrence of leakages and their importance by providingmore » a reasonable estimate of mass of displaced fluids. This study demonstrates the importance of combining multiphase flow simulations with gravity modeling in order to define if and when gravity monitoring would be applicable at a given storage site.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  2. LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1597636
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-145913
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 95
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Time-lapse gravity monitoring, leak detection, CCS

Citation Formats

Appriou, Delphine, Bonneville, Alain H., Zhou, Quanlin, and Gasperikova, Erika. Time-Lapse Gravity Monitoring of CO2 Migration Based on Numerical Modeling of a Faulted Storage Complex. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2020.102956.
Appriou, Delphine, Bonneville, Alain H., Zhou, Quanlin, & Gasperikova, Erika. Time-Lapse Gravity Monitoring of CO2 Migration Based on Numerical Modeling of a Faulted Storage Complex. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2020.102956.
Appriou, Delphine, Bonneville, Alain H., Zhou, Quanlin, and Gasperikova, Erika. Wed . "Time-Lapse Gravity Monitoring of CO2 Migration Based on Numerical Modeling of a Faulted Storage Complex". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2020.102956.
@article{osti_1597636,
title = {Time-Lapse Gravity Monitoring of CO2 Migration Based on Numerical Modeling of a Faulted Storage Complex},
author = {Appriou, Delphine and Bonneville, Alain H. and Zhou, Quanlin and Gasperikova, Erika},
abstractNote = {In this study, the performance of both surface and borehole time-lapse gravity monitoring to detect CO2 leakage from a carbon storage site is evaluated. Several hypothetical scenarios of CO2 migration in a leaky fault, and thief zones at different depths at the Kimberlina site (California, USA) constitute the basis of the approach. The CO2 displacement is simulated using the TOUGH2 simulator applied to a detailed geological model of the site. The gravity responses to these CO2 plumes are simulated using forward modeling with sensors at ground surface and in vertical boreholes. Results of inversion on one scenario are also presented. The surface-based gravity responses obtained for the different leakage scenarios demonstrate that leakage can be detected at the surface in all the scenarios but the time to detection is highly variable (10 to 40 years) and dependent on the detection threshold considered. Borehole measurements of the vertical component of gravity provide excellent constrains in depth when they are located in proximity of the density anomaly associated with the presence of CO2, thus discriminating multiple leaks in different thief zones. Joint inversion of surface and borehole data can bring valuable information of the occurrence of leakages and their importance by providing a reasonable estimate of mass of displaced fluids. This study demonstrates the importance of combining multiphase flow simulations with gravity modeling in order to define if and when gravity monitoring would be applicable at a given storage site.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2020.102956},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = ,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {4}
}