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Title: Sub-Kelvin High-Mass CCD Detectors for Dark Matter & Neutrino Searches

Abstract

Observations of galaxies, superclusters, distant supernovae, and the cosmic microwave background radiation indicate that 85% of the matter in the universe is nonbaryionic. Understanding the nature of this so-called dark matter is of fundamental importance to cosmology, astrophysics, and high energy particle physics and is specifically highlighted in the SNOWMASS 2013 High Energy Physics community report. Although Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) of mass 10-100 GeV/c2 have been the main interest of the majority of direct dark matter detection experiments, recent signal claims, together with compelling new theoretical models, are shifting the old paradigm towards broader regions in the dark matter parameter space well below 10 Gev. The SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment is seeking to directly detect dark matter using very sensitive, low threshold germanium or silicon semiconductor detectors operating at millikelvin temperatures. An improved version of this detector technology makes an entirely new frontier accessible that hitherto has only been in the planning stages at various facilities. Nearly thirty years ago, Freedman determined that the neutrino-nucleon neutral current interaction leads to a coherence effect, whereby the elastic scattering cross section is enhanced and scales approximately as the square of the number of neutrons in the nucleus. Hence, for typical nuclearmore » radii, coherent scattering leads to nuclear recoils in the range of a few keV for incoming neutrinos with energies in the range ∼ 1−100 MeV. Although CEνNS is a fundamental prediction of the Standard Model, it has not been measured until recently and may open a window to new physics. The expected CEνNS cross-section is many orders of magnitude higher than the coherent WIMP nucleon scattering cross-section excluded by current generation experiments for standard heavy WIMPs. However, this process has a low recoil energy endpoint (« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1595467
Report Number(s):
SC0018975
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0018975
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CCD, Dark Matter, Neutrino, phonon sensors

Citation Formats

Mirabolfathi, Nader. Sub-Kelvin High-Mass CCD Detectors for Dark Matter & Neutrino Searches. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1595467.
Mirabolfathi, Nader. Sub-Kelvin High-Mass CCD Detectors for Dark Matter & Neutrino Searches. United States. doi:10.2172/1595467.
Mirabolfathi, Nader. Wed . "Sub-Kelvin High-Mass CCD Detectors for Dark Matter & Neutrino Searches". United States. doi:10.2172/1595467. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1595467.
@article{osti_1595467,
title = {Sub-Kelvin High-Mass CCD Detectors for Dark Matter & Neutrino Searches},
author = {Mirabolfathi, Nader},
abstractNote = {Observations of galaxies, superclusters, distant supernovae, and the cosmic microwave background radiation indicate that 85% of the matter in the universe is nonbaryionic. Understanding the nature of this so-called dark matter is of fundamental importance to cosmology, astrophysics, and high energy particle physics and is specifically highlighted in the SNOWMASS 2013 High Energy Physics community report. Although Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) of mass 10-100 GeV/c2 have been the main interest of the majority of direct dark matter detection experiments, recent signal claims, together with compelling new theoretical models, are shifting the old paradigm towards broader regions in the dark matter parameter space well below 10 Gev. The SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment is seeking to directly detect dark matter using very sensitive, low threshold germanium or silicon semiconductor detectors operating at millikelvin temperatures. An improved version of this detector technology makes an entirely new frontier accessible that hitherto has only been in the planning stages at various facilities. Nearly thirty years ago, Freedman determined that the neutrino-nucleon neutral current interaction leads to a coherence effect, whereby the elastic scattering cross section is enhanced and scales approximately as the square of the number of neutrons in the nucleus. Hence, for typical nuclear radii, coherent scattering leads to nuclear recoils in the range of a few keV for incoming neutrinos with energies in the range ∼ 1−100 MeV. Although CEνNS is a fundamental prediction of the Standard Model, it has not been measured until recently and may open a window to new physics. The expected CEνNS cross-section is many orders of magnitude higher than the coherent WIMP nucleon scattering cross-section excluded by current generation experiments for standard heavy WIMPs. However, this process has a low recoil energy endpoint (},
doi = {10.2172/1595467},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {1}
}