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Title: Occupational and dietary differences in hydroxylated and methoxylated PBDEs and metals in plasma from Puget Sound, Washington, USA region volunteers

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Electronic waste (E-waste) recycling is a rapidly growing occupation in the USA with the potential for elevated exposure to flame retardants and metals associated with electronic devices. We previously measured polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in plasma from E-waste workers and found them similar to non-E-waste workers. OBJECTIVES: This study focused on structurally related PBDE derivatives, the hydroxylated (OH-PBDEs) and methoxylated (MeO-PBDEs) forms along with metals known to occur in E-waste. Humans can metabolize PBDEs and some MeO-PBDEs into OH-PBDEs, which is a concern due to greater health risks associated with OH-PBDEs METHODS: We measured 32 different OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs in plasma samples provided by 113 volunteers living in the greater Puget Sound region of Washington State, USA. We measured 14 metals in a subset of 10 E-waste and 10 non-E-waste volunteers. Volunteers were classified based on occupational and dietary habits: work outdoors and weekly consume = 5 seafood servings (outdoor), electronic waste recycling (E-waste) or non-specific indoor occupations (indoor). A two-week food consumption diary was obtained from each volunteer prior to blood sampling. RESULTS: OH-PBDEs were detected in all volunteers varying between 0.27 – 102 ng/g/g-lipid. The MeO-PBDEs were detected in most, but not all volunteers varying between 0more » – 60.4 ng/g/g-lipid. E-waste recyclers had OH-PBDE and MeO-PBDE plasma levels that were similar to the indoor group. The outdoor group had significantly higher levels of MeO-PBDEs, but not OH-PBDEs. Comparison of plasma concentrations of BDE-47 with its known hydroxylated metabolites suggested OH-PBDE levels were likely determined by biotransformation and at least two subpopulations identified differing in their apparent rates of OH-PBDE formation. The metals analysis indicated no significant differences between E-waste workers and non-E-waste workers. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate E-waste workers do not have elevated plasma levels of these contaminants relative to non-E-waste workers with similar dietary habits.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  2. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1593307
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-146859
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Science of the Total Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 714
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Schultz, Irvin, Kuo, Li-Jung, Cullinan, Valerie I., and Cade, Sara E. Occupational and dietary differences in hydroxylated and methoxylated PBDEs and metals in plasma from Puget Sound, Washington, USA region volunteers. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.136566.
Schultz, Irvin, Kuo, Li-Jung, Cullinan, Valerie I., & Cade, Sara E. Occupational and dietary differences in hydroxylated and methoxylated PBDEs and metals in plasma from Puget Sound, Washington, USA region volunteers. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.136566.
Schultz, Irvin, Kuo, Li-Jung, Cullinan, Valerie I., and Cade, Sara E. Mon . "Occupational and dietary differences in hydroxylated and methoxylated PBDEs and metals in plasma from Puget Sound, Washington, USA region volunteers". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.136566.
@article{osti_1593307,
title = {Occupational and dietary differences in hydroxylated and methoxylated PBDEs and metals in plasma from Puget Sound, Washington, USA region volunteers},
author = {Schultz, Irvin and Kuo, Li-Jung and Cullinan, Valerie I. and Cade, Sara E.},
abstractNote = {BACKGROUND: Electronic waste (E-waste) recycling is a rapidly growing occupation in the USA with the potential for elevated exposure to flame retardants and metals associated with electronic devices. We previously measured polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in plasma from E-waste workers and found them similar to non-E-waste workers. OBJECTIVES: This study focused on structurally related PBDE derivatives, the hydroxylated (OH-PBDEs) and methoxylated (MeO-PBDEs) forms along with metals known to occur in E-waste. Humans can metabolize PBDEs and some MeO-PBDEs into OH-PBDEs, which is a concern due to greater health risks associated with OH-PBDEs METHODS: We measured 32 different OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs in plasma samples provided by 113 volunteers living in the greater Puget Sound region of Washington State, USA. We measured 14 metals in a subset of 10 E-waste and 10 non-E-waste volunteers. Volunteers were classified based on occupational and dietary habits: work outdoors and weekly consume = 5 seafood servings (outdoor), electronic waste recycling (E-waste) or non-specific indoor occupations (indoor). A two-week food consumption diary was obtained from each volunteer prior to blood sampling. RESULTS: OH-PBDEs were detected in all volunteers varying between 0.27 – 102 ng/g/g-lipid. The MeO-PBDEs were detected in most, but not all volunteers varying between 0 – 60.4 ng/g/g-lipid. E-waste recyclers had OH-PBDE and MeO-PBDE plasma levels that were similar to the indoor group. The outdoor group had significantly higher levels of MeO-PBDEs, but not OH-PBDEs. Comparison of plasma concentrations of BDE-47 with its known hydroxylated metabolites suggested OH-PBDE levels were likely determined by biotransformation and at least two subpopulations identified differing in their apparent rates of OH-PBDE formation. The metals analysis indicated no significant differences between E-waste workers and non-E-waste workers. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate E-waste workers do not have elevated plasma levels of these contaminants relative to non-E-waste workers with similar dietary habits.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.136566},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = ,
volume = 714,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {4}
}