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Title: Electrical Arc Fault Particle Size Characterization.

Abstract

In this investigation a series of small-scale tests were conducted, which were sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) and performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These tests were designed to better understand localized particle dispersion phenomena resulting from electrical arcing faults. The purpose of these tests was to better characterize aluminum particle size distribution, rates of production, and morphology (agglomeration) of electrical arc faults. More specifically, this effort characterized ejected particles and high-energy dispersion, where this work characterized HEAF electrical characteristics, particle movement/distributions, and morphology near the arc. The results and measurements techniques from this investigation will be used to inform an energy balance model to predict additional energy from aluminum involvement in the arc fault. The experimental setup was developed based on prior work by KEMA and SNL [1] for phase-to-ground and phase-to-phase electrical circuit faults. The small-scale tests results should not be expected to be scale-able to the hazards associated with full-scale HEAF events. Here, the test voltages will consist of four different levels: 480V, 4160V, 6900V and 10kV, based on those realized in nuclear power plant (NPP) HEAF events [2].

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USNRC
OSTI Identifier:
1592574
Report Number(s):
SAND2019-11145
679452
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Armijo, Kenneth Miguel, Clem, Paul G., Kotovsky, Daniel, Demosthenous, Byron, Tanbakuchi, Anthony, MARTINEZ, RAYMOND HORACE,, Muna, Alice Baca, and LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter. Electrical Arc Fault Particle Size Characterization.. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1592574.
Armijo, Kenneth Miguel, Clem, Paul G., Kotovsky, Daniel, Demosthenous, Byron, Tanbakuchi, Anthony, MARTINEZ, RAYMOND HORACE,, Muna, Alice Baca, & LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter. Electrical Arc Fault Particle Size Characterization.. United States. doi:10.2172/1592574.
Armijo, Kenneth Miguel, Clem, Paul G., Kotovsky, Daniel, Demosthenous, Byron, Tanbakuchi, Anthony, MARTINEZ, RAYMOND HORACE,, Muna, Alice Baca, and LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter. Sun . "Electrical Arc Fault Particle Size Characterization.". United States. doi:10.2172/1592574. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1592574.
@article{osti_1592574,
title = {Electrical Arc Fault Particle Size Characterization.},
author = {Armijo, Kenneth Miguel and Clem, Paul G. and Kotovsky, Daniel and Demosthenous, Byron and Tanbakuchi, Anthony and MARTINEZ, RAYMOND HORACE, and Muna, Alice Baca and LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter},
abstractNote = {In this investigation a series of small-scale tests were conducted, which were sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) and performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These tests were designed to better understand localized particle dispersion phenomena resulting from electrical arcing faults. The purpose of these tests was to better characterize aluminum particle size distribution, rates of production, and morphology (agglomeration) of electrical arc faults. More specifically, this effort characterized ejected particles and high-energy dispersion, where this work characterized HEAF electrical characteristics, particle movement/distributions, and morphology near the arc. The results and measurements techniques from this investigation will be used to inform an energy balance model to predict additional energy from aluminum involvement in the arc fault. The experimental setup was developed based on prior work by KEMA and SNL [1] for phase-to-ground and phase-to-phase electrical circuit faults. The small-scale tests results should not be expected to be scale-able to the hazards associated with full-scale HEAF events. Here, the test voltages will consist of four different levels: 480V, 4160V, 6900V and 10kV, based on those realized in nuclear power plant (NPP) HEAF events [2].},
doi = {10.2172/1592574},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}