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Title: Childhood brain tumor occurrence in relation to external power lines and other sources of residential magnetic fields. Final report

Abstract

A population-based case-control study of incident brain tumors was conducted in the Seattle area among children younger than 20 years, diagnosed from 1984-1990; mothers of 133 cases and 270 controls participated. The relation between childhood brain tumor occurrence and exposure to potential sources of residential magnetic fields was assessed, focusing on whether proximity to high-current residential power lines or use of electric appliances or electric heating sources by the mother while pregnant or by the child before diagnosis, were associated with increased risks of brain tumor occurrence. For the 120 cases and 240 controls, risk of brain tumor occurrence did not increase with increasing magnetic field exposure as indicated by the 5-level Wertheimer-Leeper (W-L) code. Relative to those with underground wiring, the odds ratios for increasing exposure levels were: very low current configuration, 1.3; ordinary low current configuration, 0.7; ordinary high-current configuration, 1.1; and very high current configuration, 0.5. When exposure was dichotomized as high versus low, the odds ratio was 0.9 (95% CI 0.5-1.5) and did not vary significantly. When the analysis was restricted to the 96 subjects known to live in only one home, the odds ratio was 1.1. The distributions of the 5-level W-L code were similarmore » between study participants and non-respondents, and odds ratios were not appreciably changed when non-respondents were included in the analysis. No elevations in risk were found for ever-versus-never use of electric blankets, water beds, or electric heating sources. Odds ratios were slightly elevated for nine appliances and were at or below 1.0 for eight others. These data do not support the hypothesis that exposure to magnetic fields from high-current power lines, electric heating sources, or electric appliances, is associated with the subsequent occurrence of brain tumors in children.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
158455
Report Number(s):
EPRI-TR-105274
TRN: 96:005118
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRIC APPLIANCES; HEALTH HAZARDS; POWER TRANSMISSION LINES; NEOPLASMS; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; BRAIN; CHILDREN; MAGNETIC FIELDS; AGE DEPENDENCE; ELECTRIC HEATING

Citation Formats

Gurney, J G, Mueller, B A, and Davis, S. Childhood brain tumor occurrence in relation to external power lines and other sources of residential magnetic fields. Final report. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Gurney, J G, Mueller, B A, & Davis, S. Childhood brain tumor occurrence in relation to external power lines and other sources of residential magnetic fields. Final report. United States.
Gurney, J G, Mueller, B A, and Davis, S. Sun . "Childhood brain tumor occurrence in relation to external power lines and other sources of residential magnetic fields. Final report". United States.
@article{osti_158455,
title = {Childhood brain tumor occurrence in relation to external power lines and other sources of residential magnetic fields. Final report},
author = {Gurney, J G and Mueller, B A and Davis, S},
abstractNote = {A population-based case-control study of incident brain tumors was conducted in the Seattle area among children younger than 20 years, diagnosed from 1984-1990; mothers of 133 cases and 270 controls participated. The relation between childhood brain tumor occurrence and exposure to potential sources of residential magnetic fields was assessed, focusing on whether proximity to high-current residential power lines or use of electric appliances or electric heating sources by the mother while pregnant or by the child before diagnosis, were associated with increased risks of brain tumor occurrence. For the 120 cases and 240 controls, risk of brain tumor occurrence did not increase with increasing magnetic field exposure as indicated by the 5-level Wertheimer-Leeper (W-L) code. Relative to those with underground wiring, the odds ratios for increasing exposure levels were: very low current configuration, 1.3; ordinary low current configuration, 0.7; ordinary high-current configuration, 1.1; and very high current configuration, 0.5. When exposure was dichotomized as high versus low, the odds ratio was 0.9 (95% CI 0.5-1.5) and did not vary significantly. When the analysis was restricted to the 96 subjects known to live in only one home, the odds ratio was 1.1. The distributions of the 5-level W-L code were similar between study participants and non-respondents, and odds ratios were not appreciably changed when non-respondents were included in the analysis. No elevations in risk were found for ever-versus-never use of electric blankets, water beds, or electric heating sources. Odds ratios were slightly elevated for nine appliances and were at or below 1.0 for eight others. These data do not support the hypothesis that exposure to magnetic fields from high-current power lines, electric heating sources, or electric appliances, is associated with the subsequent occurrence of brain tumors in children.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {10}
}

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