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Title: NANOSTRUCTURED SOLAR FUEL SYSTEMS

Abstract

The focus of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the principles of artificial photosynthesis, working to understand at a fundamental level both the individual components and their interactions in systems. While this work is inspired by biology in terms of design principles for photoinduced charge separation, ion transport, and electrocatalysis, it involves the synthesis, assembly, and study of nanoscale inorganic and polymeric components that are structurally quite different but functionally analogous. The systems we create are constructed from dyes, electron relay molecules, transition metal oxide nanosheets, porous and nanowire semiconductor oxide films, polyelectrolytes, and catalyst molecules. The lessons learned from interrogating the detailed kinetics of these systems are relevant both to light-driven water splitting and CO2 reduction, and to dark electrochemical energy conversion systems such as electrolyzers and fuel cells.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Pennsylvania State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1582062
Report Number(s):
DOE-PSU-15911
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-07ER15911
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Mallouk, Thomas. NANOSTRUCTURED SOLAR FUEL SYSTEMS. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1582062.
Mallouk, Thomas. NANOSTRUCTURED SOLAR FUEL SYSTEMS. United States. doi:10.2172/1582062.
Mallouk, Thomas. Fri . "NANOSTRUCTURED SOLAR FUEL SYSTEMS". United States. doi:10.2172/1582062. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1582062.
@article{osti_1582062,
title = {NANOSTRUCTURED SOLAR FUEL SYSTEMS},
author = {Mallouk, Thomas},
abstractNote = {The focus of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the principles of artificial photosynthesis, working to understand at a fundamental level both the individual components and their interactions in systems. While this work is inspired by biology in terms of design principles for photoinduced charge separation, ion transport, and electrocatalysis, it involves the synthesis, assembly, and study of nanoscale inorganic and polymeric components that are structurally quite different but functionally analogous. The systems we create are constructed from dyes, electron relay molecules, transition metal oxide nanosheets, porous and nanowire semiconductor oxide films, polyelectrolytes, and catalyst molecules. The lessons learned from interrogating the detailed kinetics of these systems are relevant both to light-driven water splitting and CO2 reduction, and to dark electrochemical energy conversion systems such as electrolyzers and fuel cells.},
doi = {10.2172/1582062},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {1}
}