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Title: EFRC Materials Science of Actinides Final Report

Abstract

The Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides (MSA) conducted basic research from 2009-2019. The scientific personnel and participating institutes changed several times during the evolution of the Center, and in total included 24 senior investigators, four national laboratories, and ten universities. Workforce development was a motivating goal of the university-led Center, which included many undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral researchers. The center focused on the actinide elements, which arise from the sequential filling of the 5f electron orbitals. Although the specific themes evolved during the Center’s history, the final research themes were: (1) Nanoscale Cage Clusters, (2) Complex Ceramic and Metallic Materials, and (3) Materials Under Extreme Environments. To date, the Center has produced 254 peer-reviewed journal publications and book chapters that acknowledged only the EFRC funding, and an additional 161 journal publications and book chapters that acknowledged funding from the EFRC and additional sources (a few manuscripts are still in preparation). Broad highlights include: (1) Development of an extensive family of actinide nanomaterials that self-assemble in aqueous solution, an understanding of their formation mechanisms and stabilities, and possible uses in nuclear fuel cycles; (2) Establishment of facilities and methodologies to conduct high-temperature calorimetry on transuranium materials, and extensivemore » thermodynamic-based studies of uranium and thorium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle; (3) A vastly improved understanding of the behavior of actinide materials in extreme conditions, including high radiation fields, temperatures, and pressures, as well coupled effects of two or more of these; (4) Development of resonance ultrasound spectroscopy and direct measurement of aging of plutonium alloys.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Notre Dame
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Notre Dame
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1581399
Report Number(s):
MSA-1
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0001089
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Burns, Peter. EFRC Materials Science of Actinides Final Report. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1581399.
Burns, Peter. EFRC Materials Science of Actinides Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1581399.
Burns, Peter. Tue . "EFRC Materials Science of Actinides Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1581399. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1581399.
@article{osti_1581399,
title = {EFRC Materials Science of Actinides Final Report},
author = {Burns, Peter},
abstractNote = {The Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides (MSA) conducted basic research from 2009-2019. The scientific personnel and participating institutes changed several times during the evolution of the Center, and in total included 24 senior investigators, four national laboratories, and ten universities. Workforce development was a motivating goal of the university-led Center, which included many undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral researchers. The center focused on the actinide elements, which arise from the sequential filling of the 5f electron orbitals. Although the specific themes evolved during the Center’s history, the final research themes were: (1) Nanoscale Cage Clusters, (2) Complex Ceramic and Metallic Materials, and (3) Materials Under Extreme Environments. To date, the Center has produced 254 peer-reviewed journal publications and book chapters that acknowledged only the EFRC funding, and an additional 161 journal publications and book chapters that acknowledged funding from the EFRC and additional sources (a few manuscripts are still in preparation). Broad highlights include: (1) Development of an extensive family of actinide nanomaterials that self-assemble in aqueous solution, an understanding of their formation mechanisms and stabilities, and possible uses in nuclear fuel cycles; (2) Establishment of facilities and methodologies to conduct high-temperature calorimetry on transuranium materials, and extensive thermodynamic-based studies of uranium and thorium compounds important to the nuclear fuel cycle; (3) A vastly improved understanding of the behavior of actinide materials in extreme conditions, including high radiation fields, temperatures, and pressures, as well coupled effects of two or more of these; (4) Development of resonance ultrasound spectroscopy and direct measurement of aging of plutonium alloys.},
doi = {10.2172/1581399},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {1}
}