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Title: Understanding Biomass Burning Aerosol via Integrated Analyses of Aerosol Mass Spectrometry Data from DOE Campaigns and ACRF Long Term Measurements

Abstract

Biomass burning (BB) is one of the largest sources of aerosol particles in the atmosphere and a significant source of trace gases important to atmospheric chemistry. Organic aerosols from biomass burning sources (BBOA) are an important but poorly characterized component of the earth’s climate system. BBOA composition and life cycle processes are associated with enormous complexities and contribute significantly to model uncertainties. Hence it is important to improve the ability to simulate the concentration and properties (chemical, optical, and hygroscopic) of BBOA and the atmospheric aging processes that affect these properties. Here, we propose to analyze ambient data collected from the DOE Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign and from a long term measurement site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program – the Southern Great Plains (SGP), where transported BB plumes and elevated BBOA episodes were frequently observed. This project is aimed at 1) gaining detailed, quantitative understanding of the chemical and physical properties of BBOA and their chemical changes during atmospheric aging via advanced analysis of aerosol measurement data acquired at the summit of Mt. Bachelor (MBO) during the BBOP campaign and through integration with concurrent measurements of trace gases, particle properties, and meteorological conditions performed atmore » MBO and from the G-1 aircraft; 2) gaining better understanding of BBOA properties and its roles in radiative forcing via analysis of routine data from the ARM long-term measurement sites; and 3) integrating the results from 1) and 2) into a global database of aerosol mass spectrometry and collaborate with modelers on evaluating and improving numerical model performance as part of the ASR program.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. UC Davis
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
UC Davis
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Biological Systems Science Division
Contributing Org.:
UC Davis
OSTI Identifier:
1581109
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCDavis-DE-SC0014620
5307525779
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0014620
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Zhang, Qi. Understanding Biomass Burning Aerosol via Integrated Analyses of Aerosol Mass Spectrometry Data from DOE Campaigns and ACRF Long Term Measurements. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.2172/1581109.
Zhang, Qi. Understanding Biomass Burning Aerosol via Integrated Analyses of Aerosol Mass Spectrometry Data from DOE Campaigns and ACRF Long Term Measurements. United States. doi:10.2172/1581109.
Zhang, Qi. Sun . "Understanding Biomass Burning Aerosol via Integrated Analyses of Aerosol Mass Spectrometry Data from DOE Campaigns and ACRF Long Term Measurements". United States. doi:10.2172/1581109. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1581109.
@article{osti_1581109,
title = {Understanding Biomass Burning Aerosol via Integrated Analyses of Aerosol Mass Spectrometry Data from DOE Campaigns and ACRF Long Term Measurements},
author = {Zhang, Qi},
abstractNote = {Biomass burning (BB) is one of the largest sources of aerosol particles in the atmosphere and a significant source of trace gases important to atmospheric chemistry. Organic aerosols from biomass burning sources (BBOA) are an important but poorly characterized component of the earth’s climate system. BBOA composition and life cycle processes are associated with enormous complexities and contribute significantly to model uncertainties. Hence it is important to improve the ability to simulate the concentration and properties (chemical, optical, and hygroscopic) of BBOA and the atmospheric aging processes that affect these properties. Here, we propose to analyze ambient data collected from the DOE Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign and from a long term measurement site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program – the Southern Great Plains (SGP), where transported BB plumes and elevated BBOA episodes were frequently observed. This project is aimed at 1) gaining detailed, quantitative understanding of the chemical and physical properties of BBOA and their chemical changes during atmospheric aging via advanced analysis of aerosol measurement data acquired at the summit of Mt. Bachelor (MBO) during the BBOP campaign and through integration with concurrent measurements of trace gases, particle properties, and meteorological conditions performed at MBO and from the G-1 aircraft; 2) gaining better understanding of BBOA properties and its roles in radiative forcing via analysis of routine data from the ARM long-term measurement sites; and 3) integrating the results from 1) and 2) into a global database of aerosol mass spectrometry and collaborate with modelers on evaluating and improving numerical model performance as part of the ASR program.},
doi = {10.2172/1581109},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {1}
}