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Title: Self-Repairing Polymer-Modified Cements for High Temperature Geothermal and Fossil Energy Applications

Abstract

In this work five novel polymer-cement composite formulations were prepared and evaluated as potential cementitious material alternatives to conventional wellbore cement. These cement composites were cured at 200 °C and their mechanical properties, including compressive strength, Young modulus, shear bond strength to steel casing, and self-healing and re-adhering (to steel) capability. Thermal stability was also evaluated by curing these cement materials at 200 °C for up to one month followed by determining their mineralogy and chemical composition by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, 13C NMR, and total organic carbon. Permeability analysis was performed before and after healing a longitudinal fracture on unmodified cements and polymer-cement composites with the later showing lower (2nd/1st) permeability ratios with respect to base cements. Furthermore, a reduction in permeability of up to 80X on average with respect to their unmodified (base) cement, was observed in two polymer-cement formulations suggesting that the introduction of these polymers bring about self-healing capability. Two of the best performing polymer-cement composites were exposed to 30-day curing period at 200 °C showing that their self-healing capability is maintained. The composite stability is associated to the fact that the polymer material is stable as demonstrated by total organic carbon and NMR spectroscopy. These advancedmore » polymer-cement composites with higher ductility and self-healing capability could be used as alternative wellbore cement materials for geothermal and fossil energy applications.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  2. National Energy Technology Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1580580
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-140314
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Geothermics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 85
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Rod, Kenton A., Fernandez, Carlos A., Koech, Phillip K., Dai, Gao L., Correa, Miguel, Huerta, Nicolas J., Burton, Sarah D., Miller, Quin RS, and Resch, Charles T. Self-Repairing Polymer-Modified Cements for High Temperature Geothermal and Fossil Energy Applications. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2019.101790.
Rod, Kenton A., Fernandez, Carlos A., Koech, Phillip K., Dai, Gao L., Correa, Miguel, Huerta, Nicolas J., Burton, Sarah D., Miller, Quin RS, & Resch, Charles T. Self-Repairing Polymer-Modified Cements for High Temperature Geothermal and Fossil Energy Applications. United States. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2019.101790.
Rod, Kenton A., Fernandez, Carlos A., Koech, Phillip K., Dai, Gao L., Correa, Miguel, Huerta, Nicolas J., Burton, Sarah D., Miller, Quin RS, and Resch, Charles T. Fri . "Self-Repairing Polymer-Modified Cements for High Temperature Geothermal and Fossil Energy Applications". United States. doi:10.1016/j.geothermics.2019.101790.
@article{osti_1580580,
title = {Self-Repairing Polymer-Modified Cements for High Temperature Geothermal and Fossil Energy Applications},
author = {Rod, Kenton A. and Fernandez, Carlos A. and Koech, Phillip K. and Dai, Gao L. and Correa, Miguel and Huerta, Nicolas J. and Burton, Sarah D. and Miller, Quin RS and Resch, Charles T.},
abstractNote = {In this work five novel polymer-cement composite formulations were prepared and evaluated as potential cementitious material alternatives to conventional wellbore cement. These cement composites were cured at 200 °C and their mechanical properties, including compressive strength, Young modulus, shear bond strength to steel casing, and self-healing and re-adhering (to steel) capability. Thermal stability was also evaluated by curing these cement materials at 200 °C for up to one month followed by determining their mineralogy and chemical composition by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, 13C NMR, and total organic carbon. Permeability analysis was performed before and after healing a longitudinal fracture on unmodified cements and polymer-cement composites with the later showing lower (2nd/1st) permeability ratios with respect to base cements. Furthermore, a reduction in permeability of up to 80X on average with respect to their unmodified (base) cement, was observed in two polymer-cement formulations suggesting that the introduction of these polymers bring about self-healing capability. Two of the best performing polymer-cement composites were exposed to 30-day curing period at 200 °C showing that their self-healing capability is maintained. The composite stability is associated to the fact that the polymer material is stable as demonstrated by total organic carbon and NMR spectroscopy. These advanced polymer-cement composites with higher ductility and self-healing capability could be used as alternative wellbore cement materials for geothermal and fossil energy applications.},
doi = {10.1016/j.geothermics.2019.101790},
journal = {Geothermics},
number = ,
volume = 85,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {5}
}