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Title: Mechanisms of Organic Matter Export in Estuaries with Contrasting Carbon Sources

Abstract

Modifications in land-use and climate will result in shifts in the magnitude and quality of organic matter (OM) transported from wetlands to coastal waters, but differentiation between riverine and wetland OM sources in coastal areas remains a challenge. Here, we evaluate particulate and dissolved OM export dynamics in two representative estuary types—Apalachicola Bay (AP) and Barataria Bay (BB), characterized by primarily blackwater river inputs and high particle abundance, respectively. The magnitude and composition of OM exported from each estuary was evaluated based on seasonal measurements of surface water dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), the stable isotopic composition of DOC and POC (d13C-DOC and d13C-POC, respectively), dissolved and particulate lignin phenols, and carbon-normalized dissolved lignin-phenol yields. Discriminant analyses indicated that BB is a more particle-rich and wetland-carbon dominated system compared to AP, which is due to a lack of direct river inputs and high prevalence of wetlands carbon sources (living vs. eroded/submerged). The primary parameters explaining the predominance of particulate and wetland carbon sources in BB were total suspended sediment concentrations, d13C-DOC, d13C-POC, the ratio of cinnamyl to vanillyl phenols in DOC, and the ratio of syringyl to vanillyl phenols for both POC and DOC.more » In contrast, AP was separated by DOC, particulate C:N ratios, and the ratio of acid to aldehyde lignin phenols for both POC and DOC, indicating a more terrestrial source of organic matter and reflecting the importance of fluvial DOM inputs in this system. Total lignin export (sum of dissolved and particulate) was higher in BB (5.73×105 kg yr-1) than in AP (4.21×105 kg yr-1). Particulate lignin export from BB was greater than the export of dissolved lignin at either BB or AP, suggesting coastal marsh erosion may be driving this comparatively large export of particulate lignin.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [2];  [3];  [5];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. University of Florida
  2. North Carolina State University
  3. Louisiana State University
  4. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  5. United States Naval Research Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1579735
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-137885
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 124; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
aquatic, biogeochemistry, blue carbon, biomarker, carbon cycling, chromophoric, CDOM, climate change, coastal, coastal model, continuum, dissolved organic carbon, ecosystem, erosion, estuarine, export, flux, global change, interface, lignin, marine, marsh, Mississippi River, organic carbon, organic matter, Photosynthesis, plankton, remote sensing, river, sea level rise, stable isotope, terrestial aquatic interface, terrestrial-aquatic ecosystems, tidal, tidal river, tidal inundation, wetland, wetland inundation, wetland model

Citation Formats

Arellano, Ana, Bianchi, Thomas S., Osburn, Christopher, D'Sa, Eurico, Ward, Nicholas D., Oveido-Vargas, Diana, Joshi, Ishan, Ko, Dong, Shields, Michael, Kurian, Geethu, and Green, Jennifer. Mechanisms of Organic Matter Export in Estuaries with Contrasting Carbon Sources. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1029/2018JG004868.
Arellano, Ana, Bianchi, Thomas S., Osburn, Christopher, D'Sa, Eurico, Ward, Nicholas D., Oveido-Vargas, Diana, Joshi, Ishan, Ko, Dong, Shields, Michael, Kurian, Geethu, & Green, Jennifer. Mechanisms of Organic Matter Export in Estuaries with Contrasting Carbon Sources. United States. doi:10.1029/2018JG004868.
Arellano, Ana, Bianchi, Thomas S., Osburn, Christopher, D'Sa, Eurico, Ward, Nicholas D., Oveido-Vargas, Diana, Joshi, Ishan, Ko, Dong, Shields, Michael, Kurian, Geethu, and Green, Jennifer. Tue . "Mechanisms of Organic Matter Export in Estuaries with Contrasting Carbon Sources". United States. doi:10.1029/2018JG004868.
@article{osti_1579735,
title = {Mechanisms of Organic Matter Export in Estuaries with Contrasting Carbon Sources},
author = {Arellano, Ana and Bianchi, Thomas S. and Osburn, Christopher and D'Sa, Eurico and Ward, Nicholas D. and Oveido-Vargas, Diana and Joshi, Ishan and Ko, Dong and Shields, Michael and Kurian, Geethu and Green, Jennifer},
abstractNote = {Modifications in land-use and climate will result in shifts in the magnitude and quality of organic matter (OM) transported from wetlands to coastal waters, but differentiation between riverine and wetland OM sources in coastal areas remains a challenge. Here, we evaluate particulate and dissolved OM export dynamics in two representative estuary types—Apalachicola Bay (AP) and Barataria Bay (BB), characterized by primarily blackwater river inputs and high particle abundance, respectively. The magnitude and composition of OM exported from each estuary was evaluated based on seasonal measurements of surface water dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), the stable isotopic composition of DOC and POC (d13C-DOC and d13C-POC, respectively), dissolved and particulate lignin phenols, and carbon-normalized dissolved lignin-phenol yields. Discriminant analyses indicated that BB is a more particle-rich and wetland-carbon dominated system compared to AP, which is due to a lack of direct river inputs and high prevalence of wetlands carbon sources (living vs. eroded/submerged). The primary parameters explaining the predominance of particulate and wetland carbon sources in BB were total suspended sediment concentrations, d13C-DOC, d13C-POC, the ratio of cinnamyl to vanillyl phenols in DOC, and the ratio of syringyl to vanillyl phenols for both POC and DOC. In contrast, AP was separated by DOC, particulate C:N ratios, and the ratio of acid to aldehyde lignin phenols for both POC and DOC, indicating a more terrestrial source of organic matter and reflecting the importance of fluvial DOM inputs in this system. Total lignin export (sum of dissolved and particulate) was higher in BB (5.73×105 kg yr-1) than in AP (4.21×105 kg yr-1). Particulate lignin export from BB was greater than the export of dissolved lignin at either BB or AP, suggesting coastal marsh erosion may be driving this comparatively large export of particulate lignin.},
doi = {10.1029/2018JG004868},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences},
number = 10,
volume = 124,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

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