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Title: Citywide Impacts of E-Commerce: Does Parcel Delivery Travel Outweigh Household Shopping Travel Reductions?

Abstract

E-commerce has facilitated online ordering of goods by households in recent years. This technological advancement has disrupted shopping related transportation. While the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS [1]) finds that household shopping frequency has declined in the last 10-20 years, deliveries by parcel delivery trucks and vans [2] have increased. However, the net effect of these phenomena on overall trip making, vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) and fuel consumption has not been quantified. From a regional planning perspective, understanding the net effect is important for informing city policies--for example, in regards to land use and transportation planning. The objective of this research is to address this gap. In this study, the net regional impact of e-commerce on transportation and fuel consumption is evaluated. The approach relies on a powerful, agent-based modeling framework (POLARIS [3]) that models decisions made by individual household and commercial agents. E-commerce demand is modeled for each household using a bilevel multinomial probit structure that evaluates e-commerce participation and ordering frequency. Last-mile delivery tours were constructed using GIS-based tools and information from a major parcel delivery company [4]. After integrating the resulting supply and demand models with all other passenger and commercial traffic within POLARIS, a traffic simulation wasmore » performed and subsequently VMT and energy consumption were analyzed. The study finds that while e-commerce has generated an increase in parcel truck delivery trips, the net effect of e-commerce is a reduction in VMT and fuel consumption due major reductions in these quantities via shopping trip reductions.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) - Vehicle Technologies Office
OSTI Identifier:
1579195
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2nd ACM/EIGSCC Symposium On Smart Cities and Communities, 09/10/19 - 09/12/19, Portland, OR, US
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Stinson, Monique, Enam, Annesha, Moore, Amy, and Auld, Joshua. Citywide Impacts of E-Commerce: Does Parcel Delivery Travel Outweigh Household Shopping Travel Reductions?. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1145/3357492.3358633.
Stinson, Monique, Enam, Annesha, Moore, Amy, & Auld, Joshua. Citywide Impacts of E-Commerce: Does Parcel Delivery Travel Outweigh Household Shopping Travel Reductions?. United States. doi:10.1145/3357492.3358633.
Stinson, Monique, Enam, Annesha, Moore, Amy, and Auld, Joshua. Tue . "Citywide Impacts of E-Commerce: Does Parcel Delivery Travel Outweigh Household Shopping Travel Reductions?". United States. doi:10.1145/3357492.3358633. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1579195.
@article{osti_1579195,
title = {Citywide Impacts of E-Commerce: Does Parcel Delivery Travel Outweigh Household Shopping Travel Reductions?},
author = {Stinson, Monique and Enam, Annesha and Moore, Amy and Auld, Joshua},
abstractNote = {E-commerce has facilitated online ordering of goods by households in recent years. This technological advancement has disrupted shopping related transportation. While the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS [1]) finds that household shopping frequency has declined in the last 10-20 years, deliveries by parcel delivery trucks and vans [2] have increased. However, the net effect of these phenomena on overall trip making, vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) and fuel consumption has not been quantified. From a regional planning perspective, understanding the net effect is important for informing city policies--for example, in regards to land use and transportation planning. The objective of this research is to address this gap. In this study, the net regional impact of e-commerce on transportation and fuel consumption is evaluated. The approach relies on a powerful, agent-based modeling framework (POLARIS [3]) that models decisions made by individual household and commercial agents. E-commerce demand is modeled for each household using a bilevel multinomial probit structure that evaluates e-commerce participation and ordering frequency. Last-mile delivery tours were constructed using GIS-based tools and information from a major parcel delivery company [4]. After integrating the resulting supply and demand models with all other passenger and commercial traffic within POLARIS, a traffic simulation was performed and subsequently VMT and energy consumption were analyzed. The study finds that while e-commerce has generated an increase in parcel truck delivery trips, the net effect of e-commerce is a reduction in VMT and fuel consumption due major reductions in these quantities via shopping trip reductions.},
doi = {10.1145/3357492.3358633},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

POLARIS: Agent-based modeling framework development and implementation for integrated travel demand and network and operations simulations
journal, March 2016

  • Auld, Joshua; Hope, Michael; Ley, Hubert
  • Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Vol. 64
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.trc.2015.07.017