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Title: Army Re-tuning™ Implementation Guides

Abstract

The Army is a large, geographically dispersed organization with 156 installations and over 980 million square feet of building space to operate and maintain. The building stock spans a wide range of vintages and missions, with many serving cross-cutting functions and purposes. To meet Federal mandates and reduction goals organizationally, in recent years the Army has aggressively pursued policy and energy efficiency projects and programs resulting in a 9.6% reduction in energy use intensity (EUI) from fiscal year (FY) 2015 to FY2017. Despite these successes, the Army remains the largest consumer of electricity in the Federal government and spent approximately $1.1 billion in energy-related costs in FY2017 The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations, Energy and Environment) (ASA (IE&E)), was tasked with a multi-year study and pilot demonstration to develop a business case for the potential energy and cost reduction benefits from re-tuning™ efforts for the Army. Re tuning is a systematic process aimed at minimizing building energy consumption by identifying and correcting operational problems that plague buildings. The methodology was developed by PNNL research staff in an effort to improve building operational efficiency at no- or low-cost, primarily through buildingmore » automation system (BAS) controls. The methodology is based on two basic principles: If the equipment is not needed, turn it off; and if the equipment is not needed at full power, turn it down. Implementation of identified low-cost/no-cost operational improvements through the re-tuning process results in increased building energy efficiency, reduced operating costs, and improvement to occupant comfort.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1578284
Report Number(s):
PNNL-29078
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Underhill, Ronald M., and Taasevigen, Danny J. Army Re-tuning™ Implementation Guides. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1578284.
Underhill, Ronald M., & Taasevigen, Danny J. Army Re-tuning™ Implementation Guides. United States. doi:10.2172/1578284.
Underhill, Ronald M., and Taasevigen, Danny J. Tue . "Army Re-tuning™ Implementation Guides". United States. doi:10.2172/1578284. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1578284.
@article{osti_1578284,
title = {Army Re-tuning™ Implementation Guides},
author = {Underhill, Ronald M. and Taasevigen, Danny J.},
abstractNote = {The Army is a large, geographically dispersed organization with 156 installations and over 980 million square feet of building space to operate and maintain. The building stock spans a wide range of vintages and missions, with many serving cross-cutting functions and purposes. To meet Federal mandates and reduction goals organizationally, in recent years the Army has aggressively pursued policy and energy efficiency projects and programs resulting in a 9.6% reduction in energy use intensity (EUI) from fiscal year (FY) 2015 to FY2017. Despite these successes, the Army remains the largest consumer of electricity in the Federal government and spent approximately $1.1 billion in energy-related costs in FY2017 The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations, Energy and Environment) (ASA (IE&E)), was tasked with a multi-year study and pilot demonstration to develop a business case for the potential energy and cost reduction benefits from re-tuning™ efforts for the Army. Re tuning is a systematic process aimed at minimizing building energy consumption by identifying and correcting operational problems that plague buildings. The methodology was developed by PNNL research staff in an effort to improve building operational efficiency at no- or low-cost, primarily through building automation system (BAS) controls. The methodology is based on two basic principles: If the equipment is not needed, turn it off; and if the equipment is not needed at full power, turn it down. Implementation of identified low-cost/no-cost operational improvements through the re-tuning process results in increased building energy efficiency, reduced operating costs, and improvement to occupant comfort.},
doi = {10.2172/1578284},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}