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Title: Local radiative feedbacks over the Arctic based on observed short-term climate variations

Abstract

We compare various radiative feedbacks in response to short-term climate variations estimated from reanalysis, satellite, and global climate model datasets using the combined Kernel-Gregory approach over the Arctic (60-90°N). Except for the shortwave cloud feedback, all feedbacks are positive over the Arctic. Lapse rate feedback is comparable with surface albedo feedback. Relative to the tropics (30°S-30°N), the temperature feedback (lapse rate feedback plus Planck feedback deviation from its global mean) is the largest contributor to Arctic amplification among all feedbacks, followed by surface albedo feedback. The choice of meteorological fields has a small impact on the cloud feedback estimate, but different top-of-the-atmosphere clear-sky fluxes datasets can result in a wide spread of estimated cloud feedbacks. The net cloud feedback over the Arctic is positive due to a larger positive in longwave than the negative shortwave feedback, but has the largest uncertainty. Relative to the tropics, the longwave cloud feedback largely contributes to the Arctic amplification.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2]
  1. UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS
  2. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  3. University of Washington
  4. National Center for Atmospheric Research
  5. Nanjing University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1578082
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-132384
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zhang, Rudong, Wang, Hailong, Fu, Qiang, Pendergrass, Angeline G., Wang, Minghuai, Yang, Yang, Ma, Po Lun, and Rasch, Philip J. Local radiative feedbacks over the Arctic based on observed short-term climate variations. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1029/2018GL077852.
Zhang, Rudong, Wang, Hailong, Fu, Qiang, Pendergrass, Angeline G., Wang, Minghuai, Yang, Yang, Ma, Po Lun, & Rasch, Philip J. Local radiative feedbacks over the Arctic based on observed short-term climate variations. United States. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018GL077852
Zhang, Rudong, Wang, Hailong, Fu, Qiang, Pendergrass, Angeline G., Wang, Minghuai, Yang, Yang, Ma, Po Lun, and Rasch, Philip J. 2018. "Local radiative feedbacks over the Arctic based on observed short-term climate variations". United States. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018GL077852.
@article{osti_1578082,
title = {Local radiative feedbacks over the Arctic based on observed short-term climate variations},
author = {Zhang, Rudong and Wang, Hailong and Fu, Qiang and Pendergrass, Angeline G. and Wang, Minghuai and Yang, Yang and Ma, Po Lun and Rasch, Philip J.},
abstractNote = {We compare various radiative feedbacks in response to short-term climate variations estimated from reanalysis, satellite, and global climate model datasets using the combined Kernel-Gregory approach over the Arctic (60-90°N). Except for the shortwave cloud feedback, all feedbacks are positive over the Arctic. Lapse rate feedback is comparable with surface albedo feedback. Relative to the tropics (30°S-30°N), the temperature feedback (lapse rate feedback plus Planck feedback deviation from its global mean) is the largest contributor to Arctic amplification among all feedbacks, followed by surface albedo feedback. The choice of meteorological fields has a small impact on the cloud feedback estimate, but different top-of-the-atmosphere clear-sky fluxes datasets can result in a wide spread of estimated cloud feedbacks. The net cloud feedback over the Arctic is positive due to a larger positive in longwave than the negative shortwave feedback, but has the largest uncertainty. Relative to the tropics, the longwave cloud feedback largely contributes to the Arctic amplification.},
doi = {10.1029/2018GL077852},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1578082}, journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 11,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

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