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Title: Greenhouse Gas Activation at Late Transition Metal Centers

Abstract

The long term goal of this project is to develop novel transition metal catalysts by combining successful approaches from organometallic chemistry for the functionalization of unactivated organic molecules with strategies from bioinorganic chemistry for the activation of small molecules (e.g., O2 and CO2). Of particular interest are energy-related chemical transformations such as the conversion of greenhouse gases into useful chemicals, and in particular the activation of light alkanes (the components of natural gas and shale gas) and their conversion into liquid fuels. The current studies are focused on transition metal systems that are known to activate C-H bonds such as Pd and Rh/Ir complexes, and proposed studies are also aimed at first row transition metals such as Co. The proposed research will take advantage of our ability to judiciously design ligands that tune the electronic properties and catalytic reactivity of metal ions in various oxidation states. We are also distinctively equipped to study the electronic properties and reactivity of both paramagnetic and diamagnetic systems through an extensive series of spectroscopic, mechanistic, and computational approaches. The conversion of greenhouse gases into liquid fuels and useful chemicals should have a major impact on our society and the environment. For example, the aerobicmore » oxidative oligomerization of methane to generate higher alkanes (i.e., liquid fuels) would allow for a more efficient use of natural gas reserves as an inexpensive energy resource. This is particularly important as large natural and shale gas deposits have been discovered, and the use of natural gas as energy is expected to equal those of oil and coal by 2035. In addition, the development of novel catalytic systems for efficient hydrocarbon functionalization reactions has far-reaching energy-related implications. Hence, this project falls under the mission of the Basic Energy Sciences – Catalysis Science Program of the Department of Energy.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington University in St. Louis
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1573920
Report Number(s):
DOE-WUSTL-SC0006862
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0006862
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; greenhouse gases, alkane activation, transition metal catalysis

Citation Formats

Mirica, Liviu M. Greenhouse Gas Activation at Late Transition Metal Centers. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1573920.
Mirica, Liviu M. Greenhouse Gas Activation at Late Transition Metal Centers. United States. doi:10.2172/1573920.
Mirica, Liviu M. Mon . "Greenhouse Gas Activation at Late Transition Metal Centers". United States. doi:10.2172/1573920. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1573920.
@article{osti_1573920,
title = {Greenhouse Gas Activation at Late Transition Metal Centers},
author = {Mirica, Liviu M.},
abstractNote = {The long term goal of this project is to develop novel transition metal catalysts by combining successful approaches from organometallic chemistry for the functionalization of unactivated organic molecules with strategies from bioinorganic chemistry for the activation of small molecules (e.g., O2 and CO2). Of particular interest are energy-related chemical transformations such as the conversion of greenhouse gases into useful chemicals, and in particular the activation of light alkanes (the components of natural gas and shale gas) and their conversion into liquid fuels. The current studies are focused on transition metal systems that are known to activate C-H bonds such as Pd and Rh/Ir complexes, and proposed studies are also aimed at first row transition metals such as Co. The proposed research will take advantage of our ability to judiciously design ligands that tune the electronic properties and catalytic reactivity of metal ions in various oxidation states. We are also distinctively equipped to study the electronic properties and reactivity of both paramagnetic and diamagnetic systems through an extensive series of spectroscopic, mechanistic, and computational approaches. The conversion of greenhouse gases into liquid fuels and useful chemicals should have a major impact on our society and the environment. For example, the aerobic oxidative oligomerization of methane to generate higher alkanes (i.e., liquid fuels) would allow for a more efficient use of natural gas reserves as an inexpensive energy resource. This is particularly important as large natural and shale gas deposits have been discovered, and the use of natural gas as energy is expected to equal those of oil and coal by 2035. In addition, the development of novel catalytic systems for efficient hydrocarbon functionalization reactions has far-reaching energy-related implications. Hence, this project falls under the mission of the Basic Energy Sciences – Catalysis Science Program of the Department of Energy.},
doi = {10.2172/1573920},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Mononuclear Organometallic Pd(II), Pd(III), and Pd(IV) Complexes Stabilized by a Pyridinophane Ligand with a C-Donor Group
journal, September 2019


Mononuclear Rhodium(II) and Iridium(II) Complexes Supported by Tetradentate Pyridinophane Ligands
journal, July 2017