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Title: Final Report for Transmission of Information by Acoustic Communication along Metal Pathways in Nuclear Facilities

Abstract

Transmission of information using elastic waves on existing metallic pipes provides an alternative communication option for a nuclear facility. The advantages of this approach consist of transmitting information through barriers, such as the containment building wall. A viable candidate for acoustic communication channel is a chemical volume control system (CVCS) stainless steel pipe, which penetrates through the containment building wall. A laboratory bench-scale system consisting of a nuclear grade CVCS-like pipe and ultrasonic transducers was assembled for a preliminary communication system analysis. Because of low bandwidth and spectral dispersion of ultrasonic transducers, on off keying (OOK) protocol was chosen for data communication. Operation of the acoustic communication during normal and post-accident conditions involves data transmission on the CVCS pipe, which according to literature guidelines, will be at 50°C and 150°C, respectively. Preliminary communication system development was performed using paintbrush PZT transducers capable of continuous operation at temperatures up to 80°C. Next, high-temperature LiNbO3 acoustic transducers, originally developed for flow metering applications of EBRII reactor at Argonne, were utilized to develop a high-temperature acoustic communication system. A Gaussian pulse shape filter was introduced to suppress ringing and thus reduce inter-symbol interference. This resulted in enhancement of data transmission bitrate. Heating tapes,more » temperature controllers, and thermal insulation were installed on the laboratory pipe to study acoustic communication at elevated temperature. This included development of custom insertion heating elements for controlling temperature at pipe ends. Demonstrations of communication at high temperature included transmission of images and text files. Main achievements thus far include demonstration of transmission of 90KB image at the bitrate of 10Kbps with bit error rate smaller than 10-3 across the pipe heated to 50°C and 150°C. Final phase of project development involved investigating strategies for deployment of the ultrasonic communication system in a representative environment. Mechanisms Engineering Test Loop (METL) facility at ANL was chosen as a viable candidate for communication system demonstration. Analysis of piping manifolds at METL has shown that in a typical scenario, ultrasonic signals have to be transmitted over straight and bent piping sections. This report describes preliminary studies on transmission of information with ultrasonic shear waves across bent piping sections. A test article consisting of a stainless steel pipe bent at 90° was developed for laboratory analysis of ultrasonic signal transmission. The bent piping test article developed by welding two straight pipes to an elbow. For consistency, the diameter and wall thickness of the bent pipe is the same as that of the straight pipe utilized in prior studies. COMSOL computer simulations were performed to study ultrasonic refracted shear wave coupling and transmission across bent piping. Preliminary evaluations of ultrasonic shear wave transmission were conducted with piezoelectric (PZT) and LiNbO3 transducers, with the signals recorded with previously developed LabView interface. Preliminary results have shown significant dispersion of transmitted signals, most likely due to reflections and scattering by piping welds. Signal distortion compensation algorithm based on time reversal modulation (TRM) was initially investigated for transmission through solids, and demonstrated for signals transmitted over the bent pipe. Using TRM, it was shown that communication bitrates of 100Kbps were achievable, in principle.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy - Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET)
OSTI Identifier:
1573242
Report Number(s):
ANL-19/42
157041
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Heifetz, Alexander, Saniie, Jafar, Huang, Xin, Wang, Boyang, Shribak, Dmitry, Koehl, Eugene R., Bakhtiari, Sasan, and Vilim, Richard B. Final Report for Transmission of Information by Acoustic Communication along Metal Pathways in Nuclear Facilities. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1573242.
Heifetz, Alexander, Saniie, Jafar, Huang, Xin, Wang, Boyang, Shribak, Dmitry, Koehl, Eugene R., Bakhtiari, Sasan, & Vilim, Richard B. Final Report for Transmission of Information by Acoustic Communication along Metal Pathways in Nuclear Facilities. United States. doi:10.2172/1573242.
Heifetz, Alexander, Saniie, Jafar, Huang, Xin, Wang, Boyang, Shribak, Dmitry, Koehl, Eugene R., Bakhtiari, Sasan, and Vilim, Richard B. Mon . "Final Report for Transmission of Information by Acoustic Communication along Metal Pathways in Nuclear Facilities". United States. doi:10.2172/1573242. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1573242.
@article{osti_1573242,
title = {Final Report for Transmission of Information by Acoustic Communication along Metal Pathways in Nuclear Facilities},
author = {Heifetz, Alexander and Saniie, Jafar and Huang, Xin and Wang, Boyang and Shribak, Dmitry and Koehl, Eugene R. and Bakhtiari, Sasan and Vilim, Richard B.},
abstractNote = {Transmission of information using elastic waves on existing metallic pipes provides an alternative communication option for a nuclear facility. The advantages of this approach consist of transmitting information through barriers, such as the containment building wall. A viable candidate for acoustic communication channel is a chemical volume control system (CVCS) stainless steel pipe, which penetrates through the containment building wall. A laboratory bench-scale system consisting of a nuclear grade CVCS-like pipe and ultrasonic transducers was assembled for a preliminary communication system analysis. Because of low bandwidth and spectral dispersion of ultrasonic transducers, on off keying (OOK) protocol was chosen for data communication. Operation of the acoustic communication during normal and post-accident conditions involves data transmission on the CVCS pipe, which according to literature guidelines, will be at 50°C and 150°C, respectively. Preliminary communication system development was performed using paintbrush PZT transducers capable of continuous operation at temperatures up to 80°C. Next, high-temperature LiNbO3 acoustic transducers, originally developed for flow metering applications of EBRII reactor at Argonne, were utilized to develop a high-temperature acoustic communication system. A Gaussian pulse shape filter was introduced to suppress ringing and thus reduce inter-symbol interference. This resulted in enhancement of data transmission bitrate. Heating tapes, temperature controllers, and thermal insulation were installed on the laboratory pipe to study acoustic communication at elevated temperature. This included development of custom insertion heating elements for controlling temperature at pipe ends. Demonstrations of communication at high temperature included transmission of images and text files. Main achievements thus far include demonstration of transmission of 90KB image at the bitrate of 10Kbps with bit error rate smaller than 10-3 across the pipe heated to 50°C and 150°C. Final phase of project development involved investigating strategies for deployment of the ultrasonic communication system in a representative environment. Mechanisms Engineering Test Loop (METL) facility at ANL was chosen as a viable candidate for communication system demonstration. Analysis of piping manifolds at METL has shown that in a typical scenario, ultrasonic signals have to be transmitted over straight and bent piping sections. This report describes preliminary studies on transmission of information with ultrasonic shear waves across bent piping sections. A test article consisting of a stainless steel pipe bent at 90° was developed for laboratory analysis of ultrasonic signal transmission. The bent piping test article developed by welding two straight pipes to an elbow. For consistency, the diameter and wall thickness of the bent pipe is the same as that of the straight pipe utilized in prior studies. COMSOL computer simulations were performed to study ultrasonic refracted shear wave coupling and transmission across bent piping. Preliminary evaluations of ultrasonic shear wave transmission were conducted with piezoelectric (PZT) and LiNbO3 transducers, with the signals recorded with previously developed LabView interface. Preliminary results have shown significant dispersion of transmitted signals, most likely due to reflections and scattering by piping welds. Signal distortion compensation algorithm based on time reversal modulation (TRM) was initially investigated for transmission through solids, and demonstrated for signals transmitted over the bent pipe. Using TRM, it was shown that communication bitrates of 100Kbps were achievable, in principle.},
doi = {10.2172/1573242},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

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