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Title: At the Core: Fundamental Building Science Education Matters More Than Building Type

Abstract

As building technologies become more advanced, the need for highly skilled and qualified workers has increased. Both residential and commercial building industries struggle to capture the full benefit of these new technologies because of the limited building science knowledge base of the professionals researching, designing, building, and selling these structures. To help address this need, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Residential Building Integration (RBI) program initiated the Guidelines for Building Science Education (GBSEs). These guidelines provide guidance on the fundamental building science knowledge base that is helpful for a wide range of building industry jobs. This effort provides a mechanism for training organizations to align core curriculum that can be applied to any building type. At the same time, DOE’s Commercial Building Integration (CBI) program has been spearheading a full suite of impactful initiatives including the Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines (BBWGs), which provide voluntary national guidelines from which select stakeholders can develop high-quality and nationally recognized training and certification programs. The BBWG framework helps to improve quality and scalability issues for five energy efficiency-related jobs: Building Energy Auditor, Building Commissioning Professional, Building Operations Professional, Building Operations Journey-Worker and Energy Manager. The residential and commercial building programs are both interestedmore » in helping to create better buildings through an improved workforce. The two program initiatives complement each other in many ways. The GBSEs pave the way for more specialized training and education offered by industry and academia, which lead to credentials that signify competency. The BBWGs cover credentialing for energy efficiency jobs—a critical area that DOE believed could benefit from incentives for credentialing bodies and building operators that would improve the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. This paper summarizes the steps DOE programs have taken to work together and the outcome of this symbiotic relationship.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  2. U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1572678
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129292
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 4th Residential Building Design Construction Conference, February 28-March 1, 2018, State College, PA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Metzger, Cheryn E., Rashkin, Samuel, and Wagner, Anne W. At the Core: Fundamental Building Science Education Matters More Than Building Type. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Metzger, Cheryn E., Rashkin, Samuel, & Wagner, Anne W. At the Core: Fundamental Building Science Education Matters More Than Building Type. United States.
Metzger, Cheryn E., Rashkin, Samuel, and Wagner, Anne W. Wed . "At the Core: Fundamental Building Science Education Matters More Than Building Type". United States.
@article{osti_1572678,
title = {At the Core: Fundamental Building Science Education Matters More Than Building Type},
author = {Metzger, Cheryn E. and Rashkin, Samuel and Wagner, Anne W.},
abstractNote = {As building technologies become more advanced, the need for highly skilled and qualified workers has increased. Both residential and commercial building industries struggle to capture the full benefit of these new technologies because of the limited building science knowledge base of the professionals researching, designing, building, and selling these structures. To help address this need, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Residential Building Integration (RBI) program initiated the Guidelines for Building Science Education (GBSEs). These guidelines provide guidance on the fundamental building science knowledge base that is helpful for a wide range of building industry jobs. This effort provides a mechanism for training organizations to align core curriculum that can be applied to any building type. At the same time, DOE’s Commercial Building Integration (CBI) program has been spearheading a full suite of impactful initiatives including the Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines (BBWGs), which provide voluntary national guidelines from which select stakeholders can develop high-quality and nationally recognized training and certification programs. The BBWG framework helps to improve quality and scalability issues for five energy efficiency-related jobs: Building Energy Auditor, Building Commissioning Professional, Building Operations Professional, Building Operations Journey-Worker and Energy Manager. The residential and commercial building programs are both interested in helping to create better buildings through an improved workforce. The two program initiatives complement each other in many ways. The GBSEs pave the way for more specialized training and education offered by industry and academia, which lead to credentials that signify competency. The BBWGs cover credentialing for energy efficiency jobs—a critical area that DOE believed could benefit from incentives for credentialing bodies and building operators that would improve the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. This paper summarizes the steps DOE programs have taken to work together and the outcome of this symbiotic relationship.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
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