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Title: Super Hot EGS and the Newberry Deep Drilling Project

Abstract

A productive geothermal well drilled into super-hot rock (SHR) with a temperature above 400°C will produce super-critical fluid. At a flow rate of 60 kg/s, a SHR well could produce 50 MWe compared to 5-7 MWe for the same flow at 200°C. Even though these deeper, super-hot wells will cost more, the high energy density means power produced by engineered geothermal systems (EGS) can meet the market ($46 MW-hr) by directly tapping the heat source. We propose a proof of concept where hot rock is close to the surface (~5 km), and the cost of drilling and EGS stimulation will be lowest. A suitable, ready-to-go SHR site is on Newberry Volcano, Oregon, one of the largest geothermal heat reservoirs in the USA, extensively studied for the last 40 years. Millions of dollars have already been invested in the site by private geothermal developers and the US Department of Energy (DOE), resulting in a ready-to-use facility with the necessary infrastructure, environmental permits, land commitments, and monitoring plans. The Newberry Deep Drilling Project (NDDP) will be located at an idle geothermal exploration well, NWG 46-16, drilled in 2008, 3500 m deep and 320°C at bottom, which will be deepened another 1000 tomore » 1300 m to reach 500 °C. The original well was drilled with few lost circulation zones and the temperature profile indicates conductive heat flow. Compared to other SHR projects world-wide, this well would return more materials (cuttings, core and fluids) with more predictable drilling conditions, thus providing a suite of data near and across the brittle-ductile transition in silicarich rocks. After drilling, a hydraulic well stimulation will both change the pore pressure in fractures and cool the fracture walls resulting in permeability enhancement through both thermal fracturing, and hydro-shearing. The first step for the NDDP was an International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) sponsored workshop held at the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend from Sept. 10-14, 2017. The workshop concluded by setting ambitious goals for NDDP: 1) test EGS above the critical point of water, 2) collect samples of rocks within the brittle-ductile transition, 3) investigate volcanic hazards, 4) study magmatic geomechanics, 5) calibrate geophysical imaging techniques, and 6) test technology for drilling, well completion, and geophysical monitoring in a very high temperature environment. The second step, completed January 15, 2018, was submitting a proposal to ICDP for 46-16 deepening. The next steps will be to continue building a team with project, technology, and investment partners to make NDDP a reality.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. AltaRock Inc.
  2. Alta Rock Energy Inc.
  3. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  4. Oregon State University
  5. STATOIL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1572676
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-132215
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 43rd Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, February 12-14, 2018, Stanford CA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
EGS, Geothermal, Newberry

Citation Formats

Cladouhos, Trenton, Petty, Susan, Bonneville, Alain H., Schultz, Adam, and Sørlie, Carsten F. Super Hot EGS and the Newberry Deep Drilling Project. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Cladouhos, Trenton, Petty, Susan, Bonneville, Alain H., Schultz, Adam, & Sørlie, Carsten F. Super Hot EGS and the Newberry Deep Drilling Project. United States.
Cladouhos, Trenton, Petty, Susan, Bonneville, Alain H., Schultz, Adam, and Sørlie, Carsten F. Mon . "Super Hot EGS and the Newberry Deep Drilling Project". United States.
@article{osti_1572676,
title = {Super Hot EGS and the Newberry Deep Drilling Project},
author = {Cladouhos, Trenton and Petty, Susan and Bonneville, Alain H. and Schultz, Adam and Sørlie, Carsten F.},
abstractNote = {A productive geothermal well drilled into super-hot rock (SHR) with a temperature above 400°C will produce super-critical fluid. At a flow rate of 60 kg/s, a SHR well could produce 50 MWe compared to 5-7 MWe for the same flow at 200°C. Even though these deeper, super-hot wells will cost more, the high energy density means power produced by engineered geothermal systems (EGS) can meet the market ($46 MW-hr) by directly tapping the heat source. We propose a proof of concept where hot rock is close to the surface (~5 km), and the cost of drilling and EGS stimulation will be lowest. A suitable, ready-to-go SHR site is on Newberry Volcano, Oregon, one of the largest geothermal heat reservoirs in the USA, extensively studied for the last 40 years. Millions of dollars have already been invested in the site by private geothermal developers and the US Department of Energy (DOE), resulting in a ready-to-use facility with the necessary infrastructure, environmental permits, land commitments, and monitoring plans. The Newberry Deep Drilling Project (NDDP) will be located at an idle geothermal exploration well, NWG 46-16, drilled in 2008, 3500 m deep and 320°C at bottom, which will be deepened another 1000 to 1300 m to reach 500 °C. The original well was drilled with few lost circulation zones and the temperature profile indicates conductive heat flow. Compared to other SHR projects world-wide, this well would return more materials (cuttings, core and fluids) with more predictable drilling conditions, thus providing a suite of data near and across the brittle-ductile transition in silicarich rocks. After drilling, a hydraulic well stimulation will both change the pore pressure in fractures and cool the fracture walls resulting in permeability enhancement through both thermal fracturing, and hydro-shearing. The first step for the NDDP was an International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) sponsored workshop held at the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend from Sept. 10-14, 2017. The workshop concluded by setting ambitious goals for NDDP: 1) test EGS above the critical point of water, 2) collect samples of rocks within the brittle-ductile transition, 3) investigate volcanic hazards, 4) study magmatic geomechanics, 5) calibrate geophysical imaging techniques, and 6) test technology for drilling, well completion, and geophysical monitoring in a very high temperature environment. The second step, completed January 15, 2018, was submitting a proposal to ICDP for 46-16 deepening. The next steps will be to continue building a team with project, technology, and investment partners to make NDDP a reality.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

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