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Title: Status Report on Development of TREAT Water Loop

Abstract

The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility is a graphite based transient test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). TREAT started operation in 1959 and performed thousands of transient irradiations for the primary purpose of nuclear fuel safety research. TREAT operations were suspended in 1994, and then, several years later, resumed reactor operations in 2017 to support development of advanced nuclear fuels. TREAT’s more recent historic focus had been for transients with relevance to sodium cooled fast spectrum reactors. TREAT’s first year of modern experiment work performed in 2018, however, saw the demonstration of new kinds of transients focused on light water reactor (LWR) needs including reactivity initiated accidents (RIA) and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). The successful outcome of these efforts confirmed TREAT’s viability as a transient neutron source for LWR safety research. Since TREAT’s core is air cooled and provides no “built-in” thermal hydraulic boundary conditions for tests specimens, efforts have been underway to establish water-environment capabilities for testing specimens. Small static water capsules have been established to support single rod RIA testing where transient heating is brief. Similarly, deployment of enhanced water capsules with blowdown capability is nearing completion to support single rod LOCA testing. With carefulmore » experiment design these capsules can provide representative temperature response histories and water phase transitions for some experiment parameters. The capsule approach is appropriate for cost-effective early phase phenomena identification studies on novel fuels, or when the important test variables are thought to be fairly well understood so that they can be precisely targeted (such as they are for current fleet fuels with moderate burnup UO2 in uncoated zirconium alloy cladding). Due to lack of forced convection, however, the capsule approach cannot achieve representative temperature histories in all regions of the test fuel simultaneously (e.g. cladding and fuel centerline temperatures) while providing representative timing in water phase transitions. Nor can the capsule approach provide appropriate hydraulic conditions for multi-rod bundle testing. For these reasons, design and development has been undertaken for the TREAT Water-Environment Recirculating Loop (TWERL).« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Idaho National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
US DOE Office of Nuclear Funding
OSTI Identifier:
1572404
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-19-55730-Rev000
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 - NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; Status Report; on Development of TREAT Water Loop

Citation Formats

Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E, and Epiney, Aaron S. Status Report on Development of TREAT Water Loop. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1572404.
Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E, & Epiney, Aaron S. Status Report on Development of TREAT Water Loop. United States. doi:10.2172/1572404.
Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E, and Epiney, Aaron S. Tue . "Status Report on Development of TREAT Water Loop". United States. doi:10.2172/1572404. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1572404.
@article{osti_1572404,
title = {Status Report on Development of TREAT Water Loop},
author = {Woolstenhulme, Nicolas E and Epiney, Aaron S},
abstractNote = {The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility is a graphite based transient test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). TREAT started operation in 1959 and performed thousands of transient irradiations for the primary purpose of nuclear fuel safety research. TREAT operations were suspended in 1994, and then, several years later, resumed reactor operations in 2017 to support development of advanced nuclear fuels. TREAT’s more recent historic focus had been for transients with relevance to sodium cooled fast spectrum reactors. TREAT’s first year of modern experiment work performed in 2018, however, saw the demonstration of new kinds of transients focused on light water reactor (LWR) needs including reactivity initiated accidents (RIA) and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). The successful outcome of these efforts confirmed TREAT’s viability as a transient neutron source for LWR safety research. Since TREAT’s core is air cooled and provides no “built-in” thermal hydraulic boundary conditions for tests specimens, efforts have been underway to establish water-environment capabilities for testing specimens. Small static water capsules have been established to support single rod RIA testing where transient heating is brief. Similarly, deployment of enhanced water capsules with blowdown capability is nearing completion to support single rod LOCA testing. With careful experiment design these capsules can provide representative temperature response histories and water phase transitions for some experiment parameters. The capsule approach is appropriate for cost-effective early phase phenomena identification studies on novel fuels, or when the important test variables are thought to be fairly well understood so that they can be precisely targeted (such as they are for current fleet fuels with moderate burnup UO2 in uncoated zirconium alloy cladding). Due to lack of forced convection, however, the capsule approach cannot achieve representative temperature histories in all regions of the test fuel simultaneously (e.g. cladding and fuel centerline temperatures) while providing representative timing in water phase transitions. Nor can the capsule approach provide appropriate hydraulic conditions for multi-rod bundle testing. For these reasons, design and development has been undertaken for the TREAT Water-Environment Recirculating Loop (TWERL).},
doi = {10.2172/1572404},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

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