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Title: Radiation Tolerance and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Amorphous-Ceramic/Metal Composites

Abstract

The objective of this work was to use a radically non-traditional approach to design amorphous-ceramic/metal composites for service in extreme irradiation environments. The project was built on a strong integration among four research teams for materials synthesis and characterization, ion irradiation, mechanical evaluation, and atomic scale modeling. Rather than try to prevent microstructure changes in polycrystalline aggregates, the research team worked to evolve composite systems where one of the constituents is intentionally synthesized in a non-crystalline or “amorphous” state. Because amorphous materials possess no translational symmetry, such alloys do not contain conventional crystal defects such as vacancies, interstitials, or dislocations. These materials offer the possibility of eliminating the root cause responsible for radiation damage in polycrystalline solids - namely the production of point defects and clusters thereof in collision cascades - and could serve as the basis for developing a new class of structural materials with unprecedented resistance to radiation. The amorphous alloys were used to develop advanced amorphous-ceramic/metal composites with greatly improved radiation tolerance and stability above 500oC, and improved mechanical performance by combining the good properties of amorphous materials (high strength and elastic limit) with those of crystalline materials (high toughness, strain hardening). The ceramic component of themore » composite consisted of a high crystallization temperature and radiation tolerant amorphous alloy composed of Si-O-C, silicon oxycarbide, while the metal layer was Fe and Fe(Cr), chosen to serve as model materials for steel. A prime hypothesis that drove this work is that the composite interface, together with the composite constituents, would provide significantly enhanced radiation tolerance, similar to or superior to those observed in metallic nanolayered structures, in a more engineering relevant material system. As our experimental data and modeling show, we have successfully developed a new class of ceramic/metal composites that can be adapted for engineering applications, thus significantly impacting improved materials performance for advanced nuclear reactors.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
  2. Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP)
OSTI Identifier:
1572151
Report Number(s):
DOE/NEUP-15-7997; DOE-UNL-NE0008415
15-7997; TRN: US2000168
DOE Contract Number:  
NE0008415
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; amorphous-ceramic/metal composites; extreme irradiation environments; radiation tolerance; advanced nuclear reactors

Citation Formats

Nastasi, Michael, Demkowicz, Michael, Shao, Lin, and Lucca, Don. Radiation Tolerance and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Amorphous-Ceramic/Metal Composites. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1572151.
Nastasi, Michael, Demkowicz, Michael, Shao, Lin, & Lucca, Don. Radiation Tolerance and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Amorphous-Ceramic/Metal Composites. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1572151
Nastasi, Michael, Demkowicz, Michael, Shao, Lin, and Lucca, Don. Mon . "Radiation Tolerance and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Amorphous-Ceramic/Metal Composites". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1572151. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1572151.
@article{osti_1572151,
title = {Radiation Tolerance and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Amorphous-Ceramic/Metal Composites},
author = {Nastasi, Michael and Demkowicz, Michael and Shao, Lin and Lucca, Don},
abstractNote = {The objective of this work was to use a radically non-traditional approach to design amorphous-ceramic/metal composites for service in extreme irradiation environments. The project was built on a strong integration among four research teams for materials synthesis and characterization, ion irradiation, mechanical evaluation, and atomic scale modeling. Rather than try to prevent microstructure changes in polycrystalline aggregates, the research team worked to evolve composite systems where one of the constituents is intentionally synthesized in a non-crystalline or “amorphous” state. Because amorphous materials possess no translational symmetry, such alloys do not contain conventional crystal defects such as vacancies, interstitials, or dislocations. These materials offer the possibility of eliminating the root cause responsible for radiation damage in polycrystalline solids - namely the production of point defects and clusters thereof in collision cascades - and could serve as the basis for developing a new class of structural materials with unprecedented resistance to radiation. The amorphous alloys were used to develop advanced amorphous-ceramic/metal composites with greatly improved radiation tolerance and stability above 500oC, and improved mechanical performance by combining the good properties of amorphous materials (high strength and elastic limit) with those of crystalline materials (high toughness, strain hardening). The ceramic component of the composite consisted of a high crystallization temperature and radiation tolerant amorphous alloy composed of Si-O-C, silicon oxycarbide, while the metal layer was Fe and Fe(Cr), chosen to serve as model materials for steel. A prime hypothesis that drove this work is that the composite interface, together with the composite constituents, would provide significantly enhanced radiation tolerance, similar to or superior to those observed in metallic nanolayered structures, in a more engineering relevant material system. As our experimental data and modeling show, we have successfully developed a new class of ceramic/metal composites that can be adapted for engineering applications, thus significantly impacting improved materials performance for advanced nuclear reactors.},
doi = {10.2172/1572151},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1572151}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}