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Title: Integrated characterization of CO2 storage reservoirs on the Rock Springs Uplift combining geomechanics, geochemistry, and flow modeling

Abstract

This project improves understanding of the effects CO2 injection and storage on geomechanical, petrophysical, and other properties on two potential reservoirs, the Madison Limestone and Weber Sandstone, at the Rock Springs Uplift, southwest Wyoming. Rock physics studies, laboratory experiments, and computer simulations were employed. Two groups of rock samples were prepared, one aged with formation brine and the second aged with CO2-saturated formation brine and subsequently used for geomechanical, geochemical, and petrophysical testing. Rock physics studies provided a facies classification to discriminate among different lithologies and to investigate the feasibility of predicting petrophysical properties using seismic inversion. By applying a zone-wise regression relation established in this facies analysis, a 3D reservoir model was developed. It was determined that time-lapse seismic data are not feasible for monitoring CO2 displacement at the Rock Springs Uplift or to mitigate leakage-risks situations because pressure and fluid saturation have small effects on elastic velocities and synthetic seismograms. The small variations that do occur are due to the low porosity of the sandstone and the high stiffness of the dolomite. In the Madison Limestone, mineral dissolution due to reaction with CO2-saturated brine was observed in highly permeable pathways while mineral precipitation happened in intergranular or micropores.more » Changes in pore size were quantified via Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation time (T2) and diffusion coefficient distributions. As opposed to continuous injection of CO2-saturated brine, a subtle increase in porosity after static ‘soaking’ with CO2-saturated brine increases permeability due to the heterogeneity of changes in pore and pore throat sizes. Porosity-permeability relationships are fitted using a power-law function that can be adopted to model time-evolved porosity and permeability in a transport-limited CO2 injection process. The effect of CO2-saturated brine on the linear elastic properties of Weber Sandstone and Madison Limestone cannot be generally concluded. Considering horizontal and vertical orientations and different confining pressures, no consistent relationship between stress (or strain) data and reaction with CO2-saturated brine was observed in the nonlinear plastic and post-failure regime. The change of elastic constants due to reaction with CO2-saturated brine is more significant in Madison Limestone than in Weber Sandstone; however, no consistent trend was observed. Reservoir simulations suggest that injectivity for Weber Sandstone is adversely impacted by low permeability. Changes in confining pressure do not impact injection rate and can be ignored while the effect of changes to pore pressure cannot. The effect of confining pressure and pore pressure on the size of the CO2 plume in the Madison Limestone is negligible because of higher permeability. Geomechanical and petrophysical properties induced by CO2-brine-rock reactions were time-dependent. Simulations considered these time-dependent properties and indicate that injectivity, porosity distribution, pressure distribution and CO2 saturation were affected.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. University of Wyoming
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1572072
Report Number(s):
DOE-UW-FE23328-3
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0023328
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; Carbon Capture and Storage Geochemistry Geomechanics

Citation Formats

Kaszuba, John, Alvarado, Vladimir, Campbell, Erin, Grana, Dario, Ng, Kam, Stoesz, Erin, Wang, Heng, and Yu, Hua. Integrated characterization of CO2 storage reservoirs on the Rock Springs Uplift combining geomechanics, geochemistry, and flow modeling. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1572072.
Kaszuba, John, Alvarado, Vladimir, Campbell, Erin, Grana, Dario, Ng, Kam, Stoesz, Erin, Wang, Heng, & Yu, Hua. Integrated characterization of CO2 storage reservoirs on the Rock Springs Uplift combining geomechanics, geochemistry, and flow modeling. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1572072
Kaszuba, John, Alvarado, Vladimir, Campbell, Erin, Grana, Dario, Ng, Kam, Stoesz, Erin, Wang, Heng, and Yu, Hua. 2019. "Integrated characterization of CO2 storage reservoirs on the Rock Springs Uplift combining geomechanics, geochemistry, and flow modeling". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1572072. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1572072.
@article{osti_1572072,
title = {Integrated characterization of CO2 storage reservoirs on the Rock Springs Uplift combining geomechanics, geochemistry, and flow modeling},
author = {Kaszuba, John and Alvarado, Vladimir and Campbell, Erin and Grana, Dario and Ng, Kam and Stoesz, Erin and Wang, Heng and Yu, Hua},
abstractNote = {This project improves understanding of the effects CO2 injection and storage on geomechanical, petrophysical, and other properties on two potential reservoirs, the Madison Limestone and Weber Sandstone, at the Rock Springs Uplift, southwest Wyoming. Rock physics studies, laboratory experiments, and computer simulations were employed. Two groups of rock samples were prepared, one aged with formation brine and the second aged with CO2-saturated formation brine and subsequently used for geomechanical, geochemical, and petrophysical testing. Rock physics studies provided a facies classification to discriminate among different lithologies and to investigate the feasibility of predicting petrophysical properties using seismic inversion. By applying a zone-wise regression relation established in this facies analysis, a 3D reservoir model was developed. It was determined that time-lapse seismic data are not feasible for monitoring CO2 displacement at the Rock Springs Uplift or to mitigate leakage-risks situations because pressure and fluid saturation have small effects on elastic velocities and synthetic seismograms. The small variations that do occur are due to the low porosity of the sandstone and the high stiffness of the dolomite. In the Madison Limestone, mineral dissolution due to reaction with CO2-saturated brine was observed in highly permeable pathways while mineral precipitation happened in intergranular or micropores. Changes in pore size were quantified via Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation time (T2) and diffusion coefficient distributions. As opposed to continuous injection of CO2-saturated brine, a subtle increase in porosity after static ‘soaking’ with CO2-saturated brine increases permeability due to the heterogeneity of changes in pore and pore throat sizes. Porosity-permeability relationships are fitted using a power-law function that can be adopted to model time-evolved porosity and permeability in a transport-limited CO2 injection process. The effect of CO2-saturated brine on the linear elastic properties of Weber Sandstone and Madison Limestone cannot be generally concluded. Considering horizontal and vertical orientations and different confining pressures, no consistent relationship between stress (or strain) data and reaction with CO2-saturated brine was observed in the nonlinear plastic and post-failure regime. The change of elastic constants due to reaction with CO2-saturated brine is more significant in Madison Limestone than in Weber Sandstone; however, no consistent trend was observed. Reservoir simulations suggest that injectivity for Weber Sandstone is adversely impacted by low permeability. Changes in confining pressure do not impact injection rate and can be ignored while the effect of changes to pore pressure cannot. The effect of confining pressure and pore pressure on the size of the CO2 plume in the Madison Limestone is negligible because of higher permeability. Geomechanical and petrophysical properties induced by CO2-brine-rock reactions were time-dependent. Simulations considered these time-dependent properties and indicate that injectivity, porosity distribution, pressure distribution and CO2 saturation were affected.},
doi = {10.2172/1572072},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1572072}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}