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Title: Environmental Stimuli Drive a Transition from Cooperation to Competition in Synthetic Phototrophic Communities

Abstract

Phototrophic communities of photosynthetic algae or cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria or fungi are pervasive throughout the environment1. How interactions between members contribute to the resilience and affect the fitness of phototrophic communities is not fully understood2,3. Here, we integrated metatranscriptomics, metabolomics and phenotyping with computational modelling to reveal condition-dependent secretion and cross-feeding of metabolites in a synthetic community. We discovered that interactions between members are highly dynamic and are driven by the availability of organic and inorganic nutrients. Environmental factors, such as ammonia concentration, influenced community stability by shifting members from collaborating to competing. Furthermore, overall fitness was dependent on genotype and streamlined genomes improved growth of the entire community. Our mechanistic framework provides insights into the physiology and metabolic response to environmental and genetic perturbation of these ubiquitous microbial associations.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3];  [2];  [1]
  1. University of California, San Diego
  2. Johns Hopkins University
  3. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1571390
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5100-74455
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Nature Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Nature Microbiology
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; bioenergy; industrial biotechnology

Citation Formats

Zuniga, Cristal, Li, Chien-Ting, Yu, Geng, Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M., Li, Tingting, Jiang, Liqun, Zaramela, Livia S., Guarnieri, Michael T, Betenbaugh, Michael J., and Zengler, Karsten. Environmental Stimuli Drive a Transition from Cooperation to Competition in Synthetic Phototrophic Communities. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1038/s41564-019-0567-6.
Zuniga, Cristal, Li, Chien-Ting, Yu, Geng, Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M., Li, Tingting, Jiang, Liqun, Zaramela, Livia S., Guarnieri, Michael T, Betenbaugh, Michael J., & Zengler, Karsten. Environmental Stimuli Drive a Transition from Cooperation to Competition in Synthetic Phototrophic Communities. United States. doi:10.1038/s41564-019-0567-6.
Zuniga, Cristal, Li, Chien-Ting, Yu, Geng, Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M., Li, Tingting, Jiang, Liqun, Zaramela, Livia S., Guarnieri, Michael T, Betenbaugh, Michael J., and Zengler, Karsten. Mon . "Environmental Stimuli Drive a Transition from Cooperation to Competition in Synthetic Phototrophic Communities". United States. doi:10.1038/s41564-019-0567-6.
@article{osti_1571390,
title = {Environmental Stimuli Drive a Transition from Cooperation to Competition in Synthetic Phototrophic Communities},
author = {Zuniga, Cristal and Li, Chien-Ting and Yu, Geng and Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M. and Li, Tingting and Jiang, Liqun and Zaramela, Livia S. and Guarnieri, Michael T and Betenbaugh, Michael J. and Zengler, Karsten},
abstractNote = {Phototrophic communities of photosynthetic algae or cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria or fungi are pervasive throughout the environment1. How interactions between members contribute to the resilience and affect the fitness of phototrophic communities is not fully understood2,3. Here, we integrated metatranscriptomics, metabolomics and phenotyping with computational modelling to reveal condition-dependent secretion and cross-feeding of metabolites in a synthetic community. We discovered that interactions between members are highly dynamic and are driven by the availability of organic and inorganic nutrients. Environmental factors, such as ammonia concentration, influenced community stability by shifting members from collaborating to competing. Furthermore, overall fitness was dependent on genotype and streamlined genomes improved growth of the entire community. Our mechanistic framework provides insights into the physiology and metabolic response to environmental and genetic perturbation of these ubiquitous microbial associations.},
doi = {10.1038/s41564-019-0567-6},
journal = {Nature Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}