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Title: Investigation of Hydrometeor Distributions in Continental and Maritime Storm Systems: Application of Cloud-Resolving Simulations, a Polarimetric Scanning Radar Simulator and Polarimetric Radar Observations

Abstract

Detailed observations from DOE ARM field campaigns were used to evaluate and improve microphysical and dynamic fields simulated by 3D Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs), employing both bulk and size-resolved bin microphysics. One of the main challenges in bridging the gap between observations and models is placing the analysis in a common framework. To address this, a polarimetric radar simulator was built, consisting of a forward operator to calculate model-consistent polarimetric radar fields, and an analysis package to calculate microphysical and dynamic fields from radar data in a self-consistent manner. The assumptions required for the transformation from model output to radar parameters were carefully considered and tested. It was found that although rain is fairly well captured by the forward model, ice characteristics are difficult to constrain. This polarimetric radar simulator, POLArimetric Radar Retrieval and Instrument Simulator (POLARRIS), was then applied to WRF simulations and polarimetric C-band radar observations from Darwin, Australia and the SGP site in Oklahoma. These two locations contrast maritime and mid-latitude continental convection respectively. POLARRIS was used with NASA Unified WRF simulations of the same storms in order to compare the observed land and ocean contrasts in microphysics and dynamics. An improved model framework for dynamic downscalingmore » of large-scale aerosol products was also developed and applied to the NASA Unified WRF (NU-WRF) cloud resolving model. This improved framework was used to explore the effects of thermodynamic and aerosol invigoration in deep land and ocean convection through a series of sensitivity studies by perturbating aerosol (CCN) and convective available potential energy (CAPE). It was found that increases in aerosol concentrations yielded increases in low-density graupel in the maritime case and high-density hail in the continental case through riming by increased supercooled water. This result implies that native differences in aerosol concentrations may enhance the inherent contrast in riming effects between deep convective systems in the maritime and continental conditions. Formal publications were generated describing this research.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)
  2. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States)
  3. University of Maryland, College Park
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1571168
Report Number(s):
DOE-CSU-RUTLEDGE-14371-1
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0014371
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: ASR Grant # DE-SC0014371
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; convection, cloud-modeling, aerosol-cloud interactions

Citation Formats

Rutledge, Steven, Tao, Wie-Kuo, Matsui, Toshihisa, and Dolan, Brenda. Investigation of Hydrometeor Distributions in Continental and Maritime Storm Systems: Application of Cloud-Resolving Simulations, a Polarimetric Scanning Radar Simulator and Polarimetric Radar Observations. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1571168.
Rutledge, Steven, Tao, Wie-Kuo, Matsui, Toshihisa, & Dolan, Brenda. Investigation of Hydrometeor Distributions in Continental and Maritime Storm Systems: Application of Cloud-Resolving Simulations, a Polarimetric Scanning Radar Simulator and Polarimetric Radar Observations. United States. doi:10.2172/1571168.
Rutledge, Steven, Tao, Wie-Kuo, Matsui, Toshihisa, and Dolan, Brenda. Mon . "Investigation of Hydrometeor Distributions in Continental and Maritime Storm Systems: Application of Cloud-Resolving Simulations, a Polarimetric Scanning Radar Simulator and Polarimetric Radar Observations". United States. doi:10.2172/1571168. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1571168.
@article{osti_1571168,
title = {Investigation of Hydrometeor Distributions in Continental and Maritime Storm Systems: Application of Cloud-Resolving Simulations, a Polarimetric Scanning Radar Simulator and Polarimetric Radar Observations},
author = {Rutledge, Steven and Tao, Wie-Kuo and Matsui, Toshihisa and Dolan, Brenda},
abstractNote = {Detailed observations from DOE ARM field campaigns were used to evaluate and improve microphysical and dynamic fields simulated by 3D Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs), employing both bulk and size-resolved bin microphysics. One of the main challenges in bridging the gap between observations and models is placing the analysis in a common framework. To address this, a polarimetric radar simulator was built, consisting of a forward operator to calculate model-consistent polarimetric radar fields, and an analysis package to calculate microphysical and dynamic fields from radar data in a self-consistent manner. The assumptions required for the transformation from model output to radar parameters were carefully considered and tested. It was found that although rain is fairly well captured by the forward model, ice characteristics are difficult to constrain. This polarimetric radar simulator, POLArimetric Radar Retrieval and Instrument Simulator (POLARRIS), was then applied to WRF simulations and polarimetric C-band radar observations from Darwin, Australia and the SGP site in Oklahoma. These two locations contrast maritime and mid-latitude continental convection respectively. POLARRIS was used with NASA Unified WRF simulations of the same storms in order to compare the observed land and ocean contrasts in microphysics and dynamics. An improved model framework for dynamic downscaling of large-scale aerosol products was also developed and applied to the NASA Unified WRF (NU-WRF) cloud resolving model. This improved framework was used to explore the effects of thermodynamic and aerosol invigoration in deep land and ocean convection through a series of sensitivity studies by perturbating aerosol (CCN) and convective available potential energy (CAPE). It was found that increases in aerosol concentrations yielded increases in low-density graupel in the maritime case and high-density hail in the continental case through riming by increased supercooled water. This result implies that native differences in aerosol concentrations may enhance the inherent contrast in riming effects between deep convective systems in the maritime and continental conditions. Formal publications were generated describing this research.},
doi = {10.2172/1571168},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

Works referenced in this record:

POLARRIS: A POLArimetric Radar Retrieval and Instrument Simulator
journal, April 2019

  • Matsui, Toshi; Dolan, Brenda; Rutledge, Steven A.
  • Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 124, Issue 8
  • DOI: 10.1029/2018JD028317

Primary Modes of Global Drop Size Distributions
journal, May 2018

  • Dolan, B.; Fuchs, B.; Rutledge, S. A.
  • Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 75, Issue 5
  • DOI: 10.1175/JAS-D-17-0242.1

    Works referencing / citing this record:

    POLARRIS: A POLArimetric Radar Retrieval and Instrument Simulator
    journal, April 2019


    Primary Modes of Global Drop Size Distributions
    journal, May 2018