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Title: Oregon Offshore Wind Site Feasibility and Cost Study

Abstract

The work performed in this Oregon study assessed the present and future costs of floating offshore wind technology deployment in the state of Oregon at commercial scale. It is widely recognized that floating offshore wind energy technology will be needed if significant offshore wind deployment in the Pacific region is to occur. The study was performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its subcontractors and funded by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). It was based, in part, on assumptions and analysis from an NREL report titled 'A Spatial-Economic Cost-Reduction Pathway Analysis for U.S. Offshore Wind Energy Development from 2015-2030' (Beiter et al. 2016), which supported the 'National Offshore Wind Strategy' (Gilman et al. 2016). The strategy builds on the previous DOE Wind Vision Study Scenario of 86 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind deployed by 2050 in the United States. Under the Wind Vision scenario, 20% (17.2 GW installed capacity) of the nation's total offshore wind in 2050 comes from the Pacific coastal states (DOE 2015), which will require the development of floating wind technologies. Although most offshore development to date has been in depths of 50 meters (m) or less, 97% of Oregon's offshore wind resourcemore » is in water depths greater than 60 m, where floating wind is assumed to be needed. Floating offshore wind technology is still in its nascent stage of development but is advancing toward commercialization in both Europe and Asia. In this report, we use available floating prototype costs, pilot-scale costs, and commercial-scale costs from fixed-bottom offshore wind projects to model and analyze the cost of floating wind for five hypothetical wind sites in Oregon using specific geographical and utility grid information.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Parametrix
  3. Pacific Ocean Energy Trust
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of Interior (DOI), Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM)
OSTI Identifier:
1570430
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5000-74597
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; offshore wind; wind energy; floating; Oregon; Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; BOEM

Citation Formats

Musial, Walter D, Beiter, Philipp C, Nunemaker, Jacob, Heimiller, Donna M, Ahmann, Josh, and Busch, Jason. Oregon Offshore Wind Site Feasibility and Cost Study. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1570430.
Musial, Walter D, Beiter, Philipp C, Nunemaker, Jacob, Heimiller, Donna M, Ahmann, Josh, & Busch, Jason. Oregon Offshore Wind Site Feasibility and Cost Study. United States. doi:10.2172/1570430.
Musial, Walter D, Beiter, Philipp C, Nunemaker, Jacob, Heimiller, Donna M, Ahmann, Josh, and Busch, Jason. Tue . "Oregon Offshore Wind Site Feasibility and Cost Study". United States. doi:10.2172/1570430. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1570430.
@article{osti_1570430,
title = {Oregon Offshore Wind Site Feasibility and Cost Study},
author = {Musial, Walter D and Beiter, Philipp C and Nunemaker, Jacob and Heimiller, Donna M and Ahmann, Josh and Busch, Jason},
abstractNote = {The work performed in this Oregon study assessed the present and future costs of floating offshore wind technology deployment in the state of Oregon at commercial scale. It is widely recognized that floating offshore wind energy technology will be needed if significant offshore wind deployment in the Pacific region is to occur. The study was performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its subcontractors and funded by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). It was based, in part, on assumptions and analysis from an NREL report titled 'A Spatial-Economic Cost-Reduction Pathway Analysis for U.S. Offshore Wind Energy Development from 2015-2030' (Beiter et al. 2016), which supported the 'National Offshore Wind Strategy' (Gilman et al. 2016). The strategy builds on the previous DOE Wind Vision Study Scenario of 86 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind deployed by 2050 in the United States. Under the Wind Vision scenario, 20% (17.2 GW installed capacity) of the nation's total offshore wind in 2050 comes from the Pacific coastal states (DOE 2015), which will require the development of floating wind technologies. Although most offshore development to date has been in depths of 50 meters (m) or less, 97% of Oregon's offshore wind resource is in water depths greater than 60 m, where floating wind is assumed to be needed. Floating offshore wind technology is still in its nascent stage of development but is advancing toward commercialization in both Europe and Asia. In this report, we use available floating prototype costs, pilot-scale costs, and commercial-scale costs from fixed-bottom offshore wind projects to model and analyze the cost of floating wind for five hypothetical wind sites in Oregon using specific geographical and utility grid information.},
doi = {10.2172/1570430},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

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