skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: 2019 Wireless Test Bed Range Manual

Abstract

Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Next Generation Wireless Test Bed (NGWTB) program, is part of the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) initiative. Our nation’s reliance on wireless and Internet technology is rapidly evolving as more corporations and government agencies, employees, and handheld devices include mobile connectivity for both voice and data. The competitive advantage offered by a mobile workforce is leading many corporations to make wireless integration and convergence a top business priority. Similarly, military systems worldwide are rapidly embracing next-generation commercial technologies to accelerate network-centric capabilities and provide enhanced situational awareness. While handheld devices such as laptops, BlackBerrys, and cell phones once had limited mobility and range, they are rapidly incorporating new and multiple protocols such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Satellite, and broadband cellular (3G/4G) on a single platform to increase their effectiveness and agility. Worldwide there is exponential growth in public Wi-Fi and/or Satellite connectivity access nodes, and 3G/4G cellular continues to evolve and expand the range and speed of these devices. Additionally, critical infrastructure networks, previously isolated or connected with dedicated wireline circuits, are incorporating Zigbee for wireless sensor networks, wireless LANs for maintenance functions, and cellular or Internet based backhaul to manage control centers. Yet with all the build-upmore » surrounding wireless technology, few understand the complexities surrounding wireless protocols and security, the risks of converged network infrastructures, need for interoperability of communication systems, or mitigation measures to safely use and improve new technologies in both commercial and military environments. With no single vendor source for all the telecommunications equipment needed for wireless infrastructure upgrades, and no one entity providing end-to-end testing or independent validation, the INL's NGWTB program fulfills a niche for facilitating integrated testing of multiple technologies, across multiple wireless domains, of next generation wireless telecommunications systems. NGWTB engineers and technicians have constructed and operate domain infrastructure in the Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN), Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN), Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks (WMAN), and Wireless Wide Area Networks (WWAN). Advantages that make the INL's NGWTB the place to conduct project and programmatic testing include: • NTIA Experimental Station authority • Geographically isolated and low-noise radio frequency (RF) test areas located on a 890 sm DOE reservation • Access to isolated high-speed LAN and FOT networks The rollout of next-generation networks will involve deploying new technologies at every level including new: handsets, frequencies, antenna arrays, cell configurations that are optimized for both data and voice, massive upgrade of cell controllers’ “land-line” phone links from low bandwidth connections to higher capacity fiber or wireless backhaul, and integration of voice switching and Internet/data network protocols (Voice-Over-IP, Web phones). These systems are expected to greatly transform our nation's communications infrastructure and the types of services it provides.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Idaho National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Information Management
OSTI Identifier:
1569855
Report Number(s):
INL/MIS-19-55938-Rev000
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 - GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; Wireless; Cellular; LTE; 2G; 3G; 4G; GSM; UMTS; CDMA; Open Air Testing; HF; UHF; VHF; Radio devlopment, test and evaluation

Citation Formats

Peterson, Scott L. 2019 Wireless Test Bed Range Manual. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Peterson, Scott L. 2019 Wireless Test Bed Range Manual. United States.
Peterson, Scott L. Mon . "2019 Wireless Test Bed Range Manual". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1569855.
@article{osti_1569855,
title = {2019 Wireless Test Bed Range Manual},
author = {Peterson, Scott L},
abstractNote = {Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Next Generation Wireless Test Bed (NGWTB) program, is part of the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) initiative. Our nation’s reliance on wireless and Internet technology is rapidly evolving as more corporations and government agencies, employees, and handheld devices include mobile connectivity for both voice and data. The competitive advantage offered by a mobile workforce is leading many corporations to make wireless integration and convergence a top business priority. Similarly, military systems worldwide are rapidly embracing next-generation commercial technologies to accelerate network-centric capabilities and provide enhanced situational awareness. While handheld devices such as laptops, BlackBerrys, and cell phones once had limited mobility and range, they are rapidly incorporating new and multiple protocols such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Satellite, and broadband cellular (3G/4G) on a single platform to increase their effectiveness and agility. Worldwide there is exponential growth in public Wi-Fi and/or Satellite connectivity access nodes, and 3G/4G cellular continues to evolve and expand the range and speed of these devices. Additionally, critical infrastructure networks, previously isolated or connected with dedicated wireline circuits, are incorporating Zigbee for wireless sensor networks, wireless LANs for maintenance functions, and cellular or Internet based backhaul to manage control centers. Yet with all the build-up surrounding wireless technology, few understand the complexities surrounding wireless protocols and security, the risks of converged network infrastructures, need for interoperability of communication systems, or mitigation measures to safely use and improve new technologies in both commercial and military environments. With no single vendor source for all the telecommunications equipment needed for wireless infrastructure upgrades, and no one entity providing end-to-end testing or independent validation, the INL's NGWTB program fulfills a niche for facilitating integrated testing of multiple technologies, across multiple wireless domains, of next generation wireless telecommunications systems. NGWTB engineers and technicians have constructed and operate domain infrastructure in the Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN), Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN), Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks (WMAN), and Wireless Wide Area Networks (WWAN). Advantages that make the INL's NGWTB the place to conduct project and programmatic testing include: • NTIA Experimental Station authority • Geographically isolated and low-noise radio frequency (RF) test areas located on a 890 sm DOE reservation • Access to isolated high-speed LAN and FOT networks The rollout of next-generation networks will involve deploying new technologies at every level including new: handsets, frequencies, antenna arrays, cell configurations that are optimized for both data and voice, massive upgrade of cell controllers’ “land-line” phone links from low bandwidth connections to higher capacity fiber or wireless backhaul, and integration of voice switching and Internet/data network protocols (Voice-Over-IP, Web phones). These systems are expected to greatly transform our nation's communications infrastructure and the types of services it provides.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

Program Document:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item.

Save / Share: