skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Development and DDevelopment and Demonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applicationsemonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applications - Final Report

Abstract

Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a process by which complex parts can be manufactured directly from a basic feedstock without the need for tooling. From a defense perspective, this will enable direct manufacture of parts for legacy equipment. However, current AM technologies are limited to small part sizes (approximately 1 cubic foot), slow production rates (approximately 1 cubic inch per hour) and expensive feedstocks (approximately $100/lb). The objective of this project was to explore the impact large scale, high production rate additive manufacturing can have on military applications. First, the program explored the use of existing composite large scale (Big Area Additive Manufacturing – BAAM) systems for both tooling and direct part replacement with the use of the Army’s Low Velocity Airdrop Delivery (LVAD) system and Willy’s Jeep. We report on the cost and time required for the development of both tooling and parts. Second, the program focused on expanding the BAAM technology to directly manufacture aluminum and steel components. A robotic welding system was developed, test articles manufactured and with a final deliverable of a steel bumper manufactured and installed on the Jeep. This report covers the results of the program and describes follow on efforts to commercialize the technology.


Citation Formats

Nycz, Andrzej, Noakes, Mark, Post, Brian, Roschli, Alex, Babu, Sudarsanam, and Love, Lonnie. Development and DDevelopment and Demonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applicationsemonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applications - Final Report. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1569396.
Nycz, Andrzej, Noakes, Mark, Post, Brian, Roschli, Alex, Babu, Sudarsanam, & Love, Lonnie. Development and DDevelopment and Demonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applicationsemonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applications - Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1569396.
Nycz, Andrzej, Noakes, Mark, Post, Brian, Roschli, Alex, Babu, Sudarsanam, and Love, Lonnie. Thu . "Development and DDevelopment and Demonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applicationsemonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applications - Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1569396. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1569396.
@article{osti_1569396,
title = {Development and DDevelopment and Demonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applicationsemonstration of Large Scale Metal Additive Manufacturing for Military Vehicle Applications - Final Report},
author = {Nycz, Andrzej and Noakes, Mark and Post, Brian and Roschli, Alex and Babu, Sudarsanam and Love, Lonnie},
abstractNote = {Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a process by which complex parts can be manufactured directly from a basic feedstock without the need for tooling. From a defense perspective, this will enable direct manufacture of parts for legacy equipment. However, current AM technologies are limited to small part sizes (approximately 1 cubic foot), slow production rates (approximately 1 cubic inch per hour) and expensive feedstocks (approximately $100/lb). The objective of this project was to explore the impact large scale, high production rate additive manufacturing can have on military applications. First, the program explored the use of existing composite large scale (Big Area Additive Manufacturing – BAAM) systems for both tooling and direct part replacement with the use of the Army’s Low Velocity Airdrop Delivery (LVAD) system and Willy’s Jeep. We report on the cost and time required for the development of both tooling and parts. Second, the program focused on expanding the BAAM technology to directly manufacture aluminum and steel components. A robotic welding system was developed, test articles manufactured and with a final deliverable of a steel bumper manufactured and installed on the Jeep. This report covers the results of the program and describes follow on efforts to commercialize the technology.},
doi = {10.2172/1569396},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: